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Actions in 2019

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EWWR Awards | Meet the finalists in the citizens category


In order to support their fellow residents in becoming more environmentally conscious consumers, a group of Treviso residents set up a smartphone app called Ecoconsumo. The platform maps water fountains, eco and repair shops, and other points of interest that are useful in order to live a more sustainable life and to reduce waste. The map remains available online and is a work in progress – as more venues open, they are added to it.

During EWWR 2019, the group, which calls itself Ambimente, staged a recognition walk and bike ride with external participants, during which they explained the initiative and added several new venues to the map.

Using her creativity and charisma, this German shoemaker has embarked on a mission: teaching people how be reuse materials and thus prevent waste. The bonus? A new and comfortable pair of shoes at the end. Becoming an expert shoe upcycler is no easy feat though, for the craft of shoemaking has its secrets that take time to discover. That is why Andrea tutors small groups of 4 or 5 students during two full days before the latter can graduate to expert shoe craft masters. Here’s a short explanatory video of the workshop she held during EWWR 2019:

EWWR Awards | Meet the finalists in the educationl establishments category



The 2019 Garden Party designed by Slow Food International features ten actions that can be carried out at home or at school to contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals. Among them are reusing tableware and napkins, eating unpackaged snacks, finishing the vegetables on one’s plate, eating local and seasonal fruit and eating leftovers.

The aim of the year-long initiative is to transform good practices into good habits and to rally the participation of parents and families, in addition to the students. The campaign organised in Italian schools counted with the participation of 21,000 students from 246 institutions.

Read more https://www.slowfood.it/educazione/orto-in-condotta/

Hotelschool The Hague’s participation in the EWWR 2019 consisted of three challenges. The first consisted of incorporating the Sustainable Development Goals in general and food waste prevention specifically (SDG12.3) as the educational framework for its practical and theoretical education courses.

The second consisted of collaborating with 31 local restaurants in order to reduce food waste during EWWR 2019. The result of this action – the HoReCa food waste challenge – was a 21% reduction in the food waste generated by participating venues. The third and last challenge consisted of nudging students using various communication tools in order to minimise the number of disposable paper cups they were using.

  • Raising awareness from “El Vallín” High School

implemented by “El Vallín” High School” Asturias, Spain

An escape room where the challenge was to deactivate a virus brought about by poor waste management, a digital comic book about waste, surveys about waste-related behaviours in different neighbourhoods, and the construction of a recycled greenhouse are some of the 13 activities that this Asturian high school organised to celebrate EWWR 2019. Some 400 students participated in the initiatives – and shared their learnings about waste prevention with their families, we hope.

Visit the website: https://vallinlimpio.wixsite.com/xixon

EWWR Awards | Meet the finalists in the business/industry category

The Mutualité Française de Haute- Saône, a social and solidarity medical insurance company, has joined forces with two partners: the APF France handicap delegation from Haute-Saône and the Ress’urgences resourcery repair enterprise to launch a service to collect, clean, disinfect and repair used medical equipment like wheelchairs, standing aids and walkers.

The three goals of the action include: environmental benefits resulting from averted waste and material reuse; social benefits stemming from ensuring easy access to medical equipment for those with limited means; and benefits related to economic solidarity, stemming from job creation for those with limited employment opportunities. On the occasion of EWWR 2019, the partners prepared a video explaining the initiative.

Marking Monaco’s first ever participation in the EWWR, the local restaurant Stars’n’Bars organised a host of activities in collaboration with other local actors in order to sensitise the old and the young to the importance of waste prevention.

Among them were the creation of a giant graffiti; workshops about recycled art; a fashion show featuring up- and recycled items; one-hour hop-on experiences on waste collection trucks to educate citizens about the life of waste collectors; DIY workshops for sustainable cleaning products and toiletries; seasonal food planting; the signing of a pact committing to a zero-waste Christmas; and a one-hour live radio show about waste prevention.

Working with the waste hierarchy, CAPSA overhauled its entire operations and engaged in months-long communication in order to promote waste prevention. The dairy company redesigned its packaging of ingredients and chemical products, changed roll materials to avoid wasting cardboard, optimised the efficiency and control of its production, engaged in a company-wide effort to repair the equipment used by staff, gave workshops to its suppliers, and communicated its efforts online and in person to staff, suppliers, and customers.

The results of the initiative are impressive. Some 96% of the waste generated in its operations is now transformed into new materials. And 1,000 employees and their families (approx. 3,200 people) and over 60 suppliers have been informed about waste prevention, as has the 55% of the Spanish population that purchases its products.

EWWR Awards | Meet the finalists in the NGO/association category

Throughout 2019, the organiser of the short film festival promoted the initiative in local media and on social media and invited interested youth to submit their videos. The culmination of these efforts was the short film festival held in the Freiburg Community Cinema on 23 November. There, 29 short films addressing different aspects of cultivating, sourcing, cooking, and eating food were displayed.

The festival covered different film genres: reportages, documentaries,stop-motion films, influencer spots, and satirical shows. The result was a ‘film’ soup that went very well with the pumpkin soup served at the event.

Organised by four associations of language centres in Northern Spain, this year-long educational project featured in-classroom and outdoors activities. Educational and communications materials, including a sustainability protocol and guides for workshops, were shared with 75 language centres.

On 4 May 2019, some 1,400 volunteers gathered on five beaches to clean up waste and learn about its prevention. A wide variety of actors, including NGOs, media, and public administrations, were involved in the initiative. The communication about the event continued during EWWR 2019, when the organisers held a large-scale event in Avilés for children and parents. A likely follow-up project, “The language of the trees”, will be organised in 2020.

The #elmenajrnoesllença (#nowastingfood) prize is an umbrella initiative through which Fundació Espingoladors has promoted the prevention and reduction of food waste for over five years. Over the years, younger and older students have been motivated to create illustrated story books, videos with tips, music videos, and to raise awareness on social media about the topic.

During EWWR 2019, the organiser held an astounding 83 workshops about food waste preventions in 37 Catalan towns, thus engaging over 2,200 students! It also launched a social media campaign - #5anysdePremi (#5yearsofPrize) in order to boost the visibility of the initiative.

Website: https://elmenjarnoesllenca.cat/

EWWR Awards | Meet the finalists in the public administration or organisation category

A publicly affiliated training and skilling association in Wallonia, IFAPME has made a multi-pronged effort to teach its learners and staff about waste prevention. During EWWR 2019, one of its staff members gave workshops about waste prevention to students of different trades (bakery, catering, butchery) at various IFAPME centres that comprised both general, but also trade specific tips on how to reduce waste. Throughout 2019, the students in the “market garden” section at one of the IPAFME centres devised plans for an organic vegetable garden that was inaugurated during the EWWR 2019. Lastly, the association prepared a cookbook with anti-food waste recipes that was shared with its students, staff and other interested stakeholders.

IFAPME website: https://www.ifapme.be/actualites/lifapme-se-met-au-vert

Training material

Food waste: shorturl.at/rBDE3

Sustainable food : shorturl.at/ksUX8

  • Green habits for a sustainable Labin, implemented by Labin Municipality, Croatia

“Lola saves the world” is the name of the children’s book that Labin Municipality developed in cooperation with early learning experts. Addressed to children aged three to six, the book features a friendly bug, Lola, on a modest mission – that of saving the world, one piece of prevented waste at a time. Lola the bug was also the protagonist of a theatre play and workshop that 280 children attended to learn about reducing waste. Older students from four local schools worked tirelessly to make artefacts from art that were then displayed at the local library. Of the approximately 100 items on display, seven were awarded for their creativity and use value. The entire campaign was promoted through radio shows and spots, TV spots, and posters put up at local schools and kindergartens.

Children’s book: shorturl.at/cesUX

  • “We all participate in waste reduction” – National awareness campaign implemented by the Greek Public Service Broadcasting Corporation (ERT), Greece.

For nine days during EWWR 2019, ERT organised a national campaign to rally support for and raise awareness about waste prevention. The broadcaster hosted discussions about waste prevention during its morning TV shows with experts that also gave the public practical tips; ran TV spots about the EWWR on its four TV channels at peak times; ran radio spots on several channels about the campaign; published an article about the EWWR in its weekly magazine; posted banners about the EWWR on its website; and created a separate webpage about the initiative. The campaign was included in ERT’s corporate sustainability strategy.

Reportage about the action: shorturl.at/tvKV7

Handling waste in the time of Covid-19

Covid-19 has swept across the world in recent months. While our lives have been upended in more ways than one, we have all continued to consume things – mostly food and beverages, but also household and personal hygiene items, cleaning products, gardening equipment, toys and other products that keep us busy indoors.

Going hand in hand with this consumption is the generation of waste. Keeping our cities clean is paramount in such times and waste management companies have mostly continued to service our neighbourhoods. The people working in the sector are as exposed as other frontline workers to contamination from our waste. In order to make their jobs easier and keep them safe, you may need to change how you dispose of your waste. We encourage you to consult the website of your local waste management company for specific information about waste disposal practices where you live.

As the EWWR Secretariat, ACR+ has gathered a series of practices in waste management in the time of pandemic in order to inform practitioners, but also consumers, about what cities are doing around Europe. We invite you to consult our website and contact our colleague Paolo at pm[@]acrplus.org if you have other ideas or practices to share.

During these difficult times, just like before, a good rule of thumb is to prevent generating waste in the first place, whenever possible. You can find some recommendations about how to do so on our website.

The EWWR has moved online

Our trusted collaborators – our coordinators, volunteers, participants, and supporters – are the heart and soul of the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR). In fact, the EWWR is the coming together of passionate, hard-working people fighting for a world with less waste. But in times like these, we must do our part to ensure that Covid-19 is contained. We, like many others, must engage in social distancing.

Therefore, we have moved our activity online for the time being. In practice, that means the following:

  • The EWWR jury will convene online on 2 April to decide on the finalists for the EWWR Awards. The EWWR Secretariat will communicate the list of finalists the next day.
  • The EWWR Secretariat will host a webinar at 14:00h CET on 8 April together with UNEP to talk about sustainable lifestyles in action. Join us to learn how to communicate about sustainability!
  • We will put on hold the Let’s Clean Up Europe! 2020 campaign (originally scheduled for 9-10 May) and the EWWR Awards Ceremony (originally scheduled for 2 June) for the time being. Once we have news about the organisation of these two events, we will notify you.

Thank you for your continued support and flexibility. We hope that you are well and prioritising your safety and that of those around you during these challenging times.

The EWWR partners up with UNEP to talk about sustainable lifestyles

Sustainability has certainly become a buzzword. So much so that, for those of us who care about it, it is more and more difficult to communicate about it in a concrete way that engages audiences.

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) team has, since 2009, been promoting concrete actions and behaviours that contribute to reducing our environmental impact. For this webinar, we have teamed up with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to talk about strategies and techniques that work when communicating about sustainable lifestyles.

Garrette Clark, Sustainable Lifestyles Programme Officer, Consumption and Production Unit at UNEP, talked about the “Anatomy of Action”, a toolkit that encourages people to contribute to SDG 12 – responsible production and consumption. The initiative suggests core actions that can be undertaken in food, mobility, leisure (consumer goods and tourism) and housing. The Anatomy of Action’s assets and videos are designed for individuals and organisations educating on sustainable living, and anyone can start their own “Take Action Challenge” based on these tools at any time. And what better time to take action than during the European Week for Waste Reduction?

The webinar was also an occasion to discuss about the relevance of sustainability in the time of Covid-19 and to exchange views about the way forward.

Presentations

- The Anatomy of Action – Garrette Clark, Sustainable Lifestyles Programme Officer at UNEP

- The European Week for Waste Reduction – Carmen Valache-Altinel, Communications Officer at the EWWR Secretariat

Video recording

You can watch the video recording of this webinar here.

#EWWRPhotoContest winner

This year, for the first time, the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) held a photo contest in order to encourage action developers and participants to document and share images from the actions they organised. Why a photo contest? We wanted to encourage participants to document their actions visually. Much as we like videos, we at the EWWR Secretariat sadly do not understand all the languages spoken in Europe. Therefore, it would have been difficult for us to evaluate the content of the videos.

We received almost 100 submissions, all of them exceptionally creative. However, the entry that respected all the rules of our contest and scored the highest for aesthetics and impact of the action was a submission by the Rincon de Goya Special Education School in Zaragoza, Spain. Their action, titled “We are the protectors of the planet”, consisted in building a water circuit using recycled containers used to water the school’s sensory garden. The submission was made via the school Instagram account (somosrincondegoya).

The winners will be awarded €200. We at the EWWR Secretariat would like to congratulate them and all the participants for their impressive work!

The submission by the Rincon de Goya Special Education School in Zaragoza, Aragon
The winning submission by the Rincon de Goya Special Education School
in Zaragoza, Spain

Did you know: 5 facts about waste in the EU that may surprise you

Waste data can be difficult to grasp even for the most well-versed experts in the subject. As the largest awareness campaign about waste prevention in Europe, the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) often works with the ambiguity and misconceptions surrounding waste statistics. In order to dispel some of the myths, we have devised a list of five facts about waste in the European Union (EU) that might surprise you.

1. Households are responsible for a relatively small proportion of the total amount of waste generated in the EU. Yes, you read correctly. According to Eurostat, the institution that compiles data about waste in the EU, households accounted for a mere 8.5% of the 2.5 billion tonnes of waste generated in the bloc in 2016. Meanwhile, the construction sector and mining and quarrying were responsible for more than 61% of the total waste. That means that excavated soil, demolition waste, concrete, bricks, aggregates, and other similar materials account for the majority of the waste in the EU.

Municipal solid waste only represents a small proportion of the total amount of waste generated in the EU when measured by weight. Source: Eurostat.
Households account for a small proportion of the total amount of waste generated in the EU. Source: Eurostat.

2. But that is because our measurements are skewed. Weight is how we normally quantify waste at the moment, but it is a poor metric to use. One tonne of sand from a demolition site may sound like a lot of waste, but its environmental impact is not that great. After all, it can be easily used somewhere else. The main environmental impact, in its case, would come from transporting the sand from one site to another.

Meanwhile, wasting one tonne of beef would result in CO2 emissions equivalent to those emitted by an average car in 15 years. That is to say nothing of the water used by the cows that were the source of the beef and the land necessary for the pastures on which they ate.

Even when looking at more similar types of waste—like different types of food waste, for instance—the impact on the environment and the climate can vary widely if weight is the working metric. For instance, a study of six supermarkets in Sweden between 2010 and 2012 revealed that, although meat accounted for only 3.5% of the total waste by weight, it represented 29% of the total CO2 emissions associated with food waste.

To make a long story short, weight is not a good measurement for estimating the harm that waste does to the environment and its contribution to climate change. And yet it is the most commonly used metric in waste management because it is the easiest to measure, track, and report.

3. You wouldn’t guess who some of the largest wasters in the EU are. Northern European countries have a reputation for being progressive and sustainable. But did you know that they are also among the leading waste producers in the EU? Danes topped the charts in 2016, producing 777 kg of municipal solid waste per person. That was a whooping 60% more than the EU average.

4. Not all waste treatment methods are equal. Waste statistics can be deceiving. Did you know that as much as half the waste from Swedish households is burned in incineration plants? While burning waste is evidently better than landfilling it, the reality is that incineration is a source of pollution and carbon emissions, which contribute to climate change. Yet, it is hard to glean such details from waste statistics. Officially, waste-to-energy (the technical term for burning waste and capturing the energy from that process) counts as recycling. And officially, Sweden recycles 99% of its waste.

5. Prevention is key. To make a long story short, waste statistics should be taken with a pinch of salt. The reality is that we do not fully understand the harm our waste is doing to the planet and to the climate because we do not have good ways to measure its impact. That is why our motto at the EWWR is that “the best waste is the one that is not produced”.

How to reduce your waste this holiday season

Whether it is Hanukkah, Christmas, St. Nicholas, St. Lucia, Epiphany, or New Year’s celebration, the holiday season is peppered with opportunities to consume and buy in excess — and therefore to generate waste. In addition to what you do everyday to reduce waste, the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) recommends that you follow the tips below to limit the amount of waste you will create this holiday season.

The holiday season is an important source of waste
The holiday season is an important source of waste. Source: freestocks.org/ Unsplash

1. Plan your gift buying ahead of time and be a mindful gift giver. Do your loved ones really need an extra sweater? And will they wear it? If the answer to either of these questions is “no”, then don’t buy said sweater.
2. Give your loved ones experiences or services. Tickets to the museum or a concert, a gift card for a massage, or a subscription to an online magazine make excellent gifts. Be creative when choosing gifts.
3. Skip the wrapping paper. Wrap your gifts in old newspapers (it makes them look vintage) or try your hand at Furoshiki – the Japanese technique to wrap gifts in reusable cloth.
4. Buy used, remanufactured, upcycled, or recycled products. You do not need to buy everything anew. A used bike, for instance, can be as good as – and sometimes even better than – a new one if it is properly maintained.
5. Make sure to get a gift receipt from the store. Allow your loved ones to exchange the gifts they receive if they do not like them or if they do not fit.
6. Mind the tree: do not buy a cheap artificial tree that you will throw away after one year, because they can’t be recycled. Either buy one that you’ll want to use again and again or a potted (real) Christmas tree that you can replant in your (or any) garden after the festive season is over.
7. Don’t toss the leftovers – the holidays are notorious for the size of the meals (or should we call them feasts?) served at family dinners and lunches and for the amount of food waste associated with them. Don’t waste food this holiday season! Share your leftovers with others or simply freeze them for later consumption.

You can find more tips on how to reduce your waste this holiday season in this guide by Zero Waste Scotland. We also recommend Zerowastenerd’s list of low- and zero-waste gifts.

The EWWR 2019 is over. Now what?

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) 2019 may be over for now, but waste reduction is an ongoing job. We encourage you to use the campaign as a springboard to permanently change your habits surrounding consumption and waste. Here are some tips on how to save waste in everyday life. Also, feel free to use the ideas in our targeted communication toolkits to organise waste prevention, reuse, recycling, and clean-up actions in your community, school, company, or municipality year-round.

Also, keep your eyes on our social media and website for two big upcoming EWWR events:

2 June 2020: the EWWR 2019 Awards Ceremony will take place at the European Committee of the Regions in Brussels. It will reward six impactful and creative actions organised during EWWR 2019 and selected by a specialized jury. Just like in 2019, the event will open the EU Green Week.

21-29 November 2020: EWWR 2020

More details will follow shortly.

The EWWR 2019 breaks new records

The 11th edition of the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) was every bit as inspiring and lively as we expected it to be. Between 16 and 24 November, thousands of people from all over Europe and beyond joined our initiative to promote waste prevention in their communities, schools, companies, and to their peers online and in person.

We at the EWWR Secretariat followed many of those actions online and were impressed to see how active and engaging EWWR coordinators and action developers were. From awareness campaigns in the Dominican Republic to repair trucks and waste-themed escape rooms in Catalonia and from zero-food waste cooking shows in Italy to endurance kayaking in Lithuania, the 16,570+ actions organised as part of EWWR 2019 were impressively creative and impactful.

The level of coverage and traction that this record-breaking edition has received is encouraging. This edition, the EWWR was featured on TV in Greece and Spain, in leading national and regional newspapers across the continent, on the radio in France, Spain, and Hungary, and even in the press releases of EU institutions like the European Economic and Social Committee. From Canada to Japan, messages of support have poured in and continue to do so. Volunteers have shared their photos and videos and we have received requests to organise the campaign in more places next year.

The “3R Forest” was one of the actions organised for the EWWR 2019. Pictured here is the 3R tree developed by the Colunga Municipality in Asturias, Spain.
The “3R Forest” was one of the actions organised for the EWWR 2019. Pictured here
is the 3R tree erected by the Colunga Municipality in Asturias, Spain.

We would like to thank everyone who carried out actions, participated in them, or otherwise contributed to the EWWR 2019 for helping the project start its second decade off on the right foot. A special thank you to the 40 coordinators who have worked industriously to spread the word about the EWWR this year and to support the thousands of volunteers that took part in the campaign at the local level.

Wondering who are the people who’ve helped make the EWWR 2019 a reality? Check out the interviews in our meet the #EWWRCoordinators series:

See more highlights of the EWWR 2019 in our press file, Twitter Moment, YouTube playlist, and Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter feeds. You can also find what our coordinators and action developers have posted online about their actions by searching for #EWWR2019, #ReduceYourWaste, #SERD2019, #SERR2019, and #SEPR2019, among others.

Meet the #EWWR Coordinators: the Hungarian Association of Environmental Enterprises team

Please introduce yourselves briefly.

The Hungarian Association of Environmental Enterprises (HAEE) represents the Hungarian Green Industry. Thanks to our 240 members, we have a huge outreach and network in the country. We organise conferences and workgroup meetings on current issues like waste management, awareness-raising, remediation, environmental measurements and sampling, air quality protection, sewage sludge treatment and sewage management. Our main Fair, The ÖKOINDUSTRIA Green Expo will take place in Budapest in November 2020.

Our association has also founded the Awards for Environmental Protection, a yearly occurrence aimed at promoting the most responsible and environmentally conscious companies and experts in Hungary.

The EWWR team at the Hungarian Association of Environmental Enterprises
The EWWR team at the Hungarian Association of Environmental Enterprises

What’s the story behind your participation in the EWWR?

Our association was officially invited to be the country coordinator by the Ministry of Innovation and Technology this year. It is a great honor to represent the Hungarian actions in the EWWR. Our team’s favourite task is awareness raising, so we are very motivated to use our network countrywide. We participated in previous editions of the EWWR in a wide variety of roles, so we know how to motivate target groups and how to make them eager to participate.

What are some actions organised in Hungary that stand out to you?

We would like to highlight four projects that are being carried out this year and that stand out to us.

  • What’s the use - Poetry Slam against overconsumption. During the program, the organisers expect amateur slammers to apply with 3-minute texts about the fight against overconsumption and conscious shopping. The innovative face of the project is based precisely on the creativity of its creators, as the freedom of the genre allows for a wide variety of interpretations.
  • The General Court created the Green Court Task Force this fall to develop eco-friendly solutions and programs within the organisation to strengthen the spirit that they can do for the environment at work. The Task Force has put together a complex program package that will provide opportunities for knowledge acquisition, personal activity, and exploration of competencies during EWWR and beyond.
  • István Bobál, a smallholder farmer who sells his produce at the Hunyadi Square Market, decided to reduce plastic pollution for the sake of his grandchildren’s future. Together with his family, they made reusable bags out of their old curtains and textiles and handed them out to their customers to carry vegetables and fruit in them. Next to their booth is a large billboard announcing the action that highlights the dangers of climate change and the importance of environmental awareness.
  • The Fészek Waldorf School in Solymar organised the Green Action Project Week, during which students will repair, recycle, plant trees, go into the woods, get information and inform others, observe their own consumption, meet and even become climate activists.

How is EWWR 2019 going in Hungary?

This year’s campaign is going very well thanks to our regional Green Leaders. With their support and enthusiastic work, we have been able to involve all the regions in Hungary in the EWWR. The map of actions shows how well the campaign is balanced. We managed to register 411 actions, so we are very satisfied and looking forward to seeing these actions being carried out. Beyond the numbers, we believe that the quality of our communications is an even better indicator. We hope that, thanks to it, the projects that will be implemented will be continued for a long time and become part of everyday life.

Meet the #EWWRCoordinators: Elena Fernandez from Asturias, Spain

Briefly introduce yourself

My name is Elena Fernández. I am a chemical engineer by training and work for the Asturian waste management company COGERSA. This is our 10th year coordinating the EWWR in the region.

Elena Fernandez from Asturias
Elena Fernandez from Asturias

What do you like the most about being an EWWR coordinator?

For me personally, it is very motivating and rewarding to see how, over the course of the past decade, a gradual change is taking place
in the social fabric of our region with regard to how environmental, and particularly waste, issues are dealt with. Every day, more and more public authorities, associations, schools, companies, and citizens are taking part in the project.

How is EWWR 2019 going in Asturias?

This year was particularly successful. Some 36 municipalities and 74 schools will participate in our landmark action – the 3R Forest – and we are expecting over 120 trees thanks to it. Aside from it, 226 other actions are being organised this week.

What advice would you give to more recent coordinators?

I encourage them to work with passion on this exciting project.

Meet the #EWWRCoordinators: Daniel Lamas from Portugal

Briefly introduce yourself:

Hi. I’m Daniel, a 38-year-old environmental engineer from Porto, in the north of Portugal. I’ve been working in the waste sector for over a decade and I currently head the environmental monitoring department at Ambisousa, the waste management company responsible for the Sousa Valley. I am also the technical manager of selective waste collection at the company.

Daniel Lamas is the EWWR Coordinator for the Sousa Valley in Portugal
Daniel Lamas is the EWWR Coordinator for the Sousa Valley in Portugal

What’s the story behind your participation in the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR)?

It began with an interest in preventing waste production and implementing a home composting project in Ambisousa.

That prompted us to want to learn about other projects and contexts in Europe so that we can evaluate their implementation in the municipalities of Ambisousa.

What do you like about being an EWWR coordinator?

I like the ability to learn from other places and to realise that, sometimes, small actions can have a very big impact.

Meet the #EWWRCoordinators: Catarina Mogo Pereira from Portugal

​Please introduce yourself.

My name is Catarina and I work as an environmental engineer for Inframoura, the urbanisation company in Vilamoura, in the Algarve region in the south of Portugal. I’ve been with the company for 13 years.

What’s the story behind your participation in the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR)?

We’ve wanted to take part in the EWWR as a coordinator for several years, but this year was the right time for us to join this great European initiative.

Catarina Mogo Pereira is the #EWWRCoordinator for Vilamoura in Algarve, Portugal
Catarina Mogo Pereira is the #EWWRCoordinator for Vilamoura in Algarve, Portugal

What is your favourite part about being an EWWR coordinator?

I really like the social element behind the campaign: the fact that I had the opportunity to meet new people locally thanks to the EWWR, It is impressive to see just how many people are passionate about the subject of waste prevention. It’s been a very positive experience overall.

What are some actions organized in your region that stand out to you?

All! This year we’re having a few, but good, actions that are being organised with a lot of enthusiasm.

How did this year’s campaign go?

It has exceeded expectations. Our original goal was to carry out our own action: a day-long seminar that will gather different types of actors working with or influencing waste management in our area. The fact that we had 10 other actions registered surpassed our expectations?

The EWWR team at Inframoura
The EWWR team at Inframoura

Anything else you’d like to add?

Ours was a team effort. My colleagues Alina Corney, Vânia Revez and Inês Reis (see photo above) were equally as instrumental to the organisation of the EWWR 2019 campaign in Vilamoura as I was.

Registrations for the European Week for Waste Reduction are now open!

Are you ready to take part in the EWWR 2019? From now on, you are welcome to register your action and take part in the biggest awareness-raising campaign on waste reduction in Europe. You have time until 8 November!

Do you believe that the amount of waste produced is too much? No matter if you are a public authority, association, NGO, business, educational establishment or simple individual, everybody can become an action developer.

Organise an action focusing on the “3Rs”: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle, and contribute to the change. All kinds of actions are welcome: workshops, conferences, contests, games, exhibitions, information campaigns…the more the merrier!

Waste Education and Communication is in the spotlight this year to encourage behavioural change.Change your ways, reduce your waste is our slogan. Do not underestimate the power of little actions, the change starts also from a bottom-up revolution of our daily habits! Have a look at our page to see new content specifically created for this theme.

Do you have some fresh ideas on what could make a positive change? Then follow this link www.ewwr.eu/register, complete your registration, get access to all the EWWR Communication tools and start planning your action.

The EWWR will take place between 16 and 24 November 2019.You can #EWWR2019 and #ReduceYourWaste to spread the word on social media.

For further information explore our website. Should you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact the EWWR
Secretariat. We are curious to hear about all your initiatives planned for November!

Meet our new coordinators!

We are pleased to announce the fact that five new coordinators and two returning coordinators have joined the EWWR this year.

Specifically, they are:

o The Environmental Department of the Government of the Balearic Islands;

o The Environmental Department of the Extremadura Region in Spain;

o The Environmental and Regional Development Ministry of Latvia;

o The Environmental Department of the Madrid Region;

o The Environmental Department of the Government of the Principality of Monaco;

o The National Agency for Environmental Protection (ANPM) of Romania;

o Tratolixo, the Portuguese waste management company responsible, among others, for the municipalities of Cascais, Oeiras, Mafra and Sintra.


The EWWR Secretariat will continue to accept applications for coordinator until the end of August. Therefore, we encourage you to contact us at contact@ewwr.eu if you are interested and if you cannot find an existing coordinator in your country or region. At the moment, we are lacking coordinators for the following European countries (though non-European countries are encouraged to apply as well): Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, Georgia, Greece, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Switzerland, Turkey and Ukraine.

Who can be a coordinator?

Normally, national or regional authorities in charge of waste management or waste management companies are the ones who coordinate EWWR campaigns on their territories. That said, there have been exceptions to this rule. If you are interested in becoming a coordinator, please let us know even if you do not represent a public entity.

EWWR coordinators at a meeting in May 2019
EWWR coordinators at a meeting in May 2019

What does being a coordinator consist of?

EWWR coordinators are the heart and soul of the project. They help spread the word about the initiative at the local level, convince those interested (we call them action developers) to undertake waste prevention actions, help them organise different initiatives and to spread the word about them, as well as document and monitor activities. While there is no form of monetary compensation for the role, it can be immensely gratifying for those who like to work with the community on promoting waste prevention.

EWWR Training Session #10

On 15 July, the EWWR Secretariat held an online workshop during which our experienced coordinators Mireia Padros Tremoleda from the Catalan Waste Agency and Colette Caruana from Wasteserv Malta spoke about their experience organising EWWR campaigns. The workshop was meant to help new EWWR coordinators get started and to answer some of their questions.

Source: www.pexels.com
Source: www.pexels.com

The panelists covered a series of topics during the session, including:

- How and when to promote EWWR at the local level using a variety of channels (media,social media, mailings, seminars/ workshops);

- How to register actions using the EWWR registration tool (for more details, check out this guide on how to register actions);

- How to make use of the generic and thematic communications tools that the EWWR Secretariat makes available (and develop your own);

- And lastly, how to inspire others with ideas for actions (here, the advice ran the gamut from creating a local website and uploading factsheets and activity sheets there to using some of the EWWR toolkits available in 8 languages).

Aside from these topics, the two coordinators shared specific tips that proved very useful to inspire local stakeholders to takepart in EWWR in their experience. Among them were the organisation of an EWWR awards ceremony locally and suggesting that businesses carry out waste audits (Malta) and undertaking training sessions for those interested and making sure that action developers communicate their initiatives well on social media and other channels (Catalonia).

For more information and to download the audio recording of the webinar, please visit the EWWR website.

EWWR partners up with the FAO and IFWC to prevent food waste in schools

This year, the EWWR has joined forces with the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and the International Food Waste Coalition (IFWC) to promote food waste prevention in schools.

As a first step in this collaboration, on 26 June, the EWWR Secretariat organised a webinar to present the FAO and IFWC Do Good: Save Food!educational package, which consists of different modules that teachers can use in class and to plan lessons and activities concerning this topic. Alongside these materials, the authors developed complementary guides to help kitchen and canteen staff in schools track food waste and implement a comprehensive approach to reduce food waste by creating links among them and other actors along the value chain. The educational guides are a great source of inspiration for EWWR actions and can be part of longer-term initiatives to fight food waste.

Source: UN FAO and IFWC
Source: UN FAO and IFWC

Do Good: Save Food! has already been piloted in schools in Italy, UK, France and Belgium. The FAO and the IFWC are now looking for more municipalities willing to replicate the programme. To learn more about this opportunity, please get in touch with Thomas Candeal (thomas.candeal [AT] internationalfoodwastecoalition.org) and Oksana Sapiga (Oksana.Sapiga [AT] fao.org).

The webinar also featured success stories and tips from two of our EWWR Coordinators representing the Catalan Waste Agency and Zero Waste Scotland respectively. The speakers talked about the results of two projects that had been implemented on their territories with the aim of reducing food waste, namely the Weigh and Think initiative and the Chefs@School programme.

To learn more about the topic and the campaign, we encourage you to listen to the video recording of out webinar and to download the presentations on our website.

The Do Good: Save Food! materials in English and French are available for download on this page.

Sixth edition of LCUE clocks in almost 17,000 actions

Source: Lafarge Cementos / LCUE
Source: Lafarge Cementos / LCUE

Held between 1 March and 30 June, the 2019 edition of the Let’s Clean Up Europe! (LCUE) campaign boasts impressive results: 16,840 actions were carried out with the participation of 675,000 volunteers! The outcome? 265,000 tonnes of waste collected from Europe’s . Europe Day, which was celebrated on 9 May this year, was the focal point for the campaign and also the day when the majority of the actions were organized.

Also known as the European spring clean-up, LCUE is a sister initiative of EWWR’s that started in 2014. It is managed by the International Association for Environmental Communication (AICA) and, this year, saw the organization of clean-up actions in 19 European countries.

Learn more about LCUE by reading the press release about this year’s campaign, visiting the website and following the campaign on Facebook (Let’s Clean Up Europe – Official) and Twitter (@LetsCleanUpEU).

Join us for the 2019 campaign and #ReduceYourWaste!

Are you worried about our negative impact on the environment? Do you want to do something to help your community change for the better? Then join the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR), the largest waste reduction initiative on the continent, between 16 and 24 November and make a difference!

Under the umbrella of the theme ‘waste education and communication’, EWWR encourages volunteers from across Europe and beyond to carry out awareness raising actions about waste prevention, reuse and recycling in their communities. Our slogan this year will be “Change your ways, Reduce your waste”, which is a call to action to encourage participants to reflect on and change their habits in order to reduce waste. This year’s theme lends itself well to a variety of actions and topics. For instance, organisers can choose to focus on a specific waste fraction like organic, textiles or packaging and to target their actions to different age groups or demographics.

If you would like to explore some of communications materials and ideas for actions that the EWWR Secretariat has prepared for this year’s campaign, we encourage you to visit the relevant page on our website and to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. As always, you can also turn to our trusted communications toolkits, which are available in seven languages, for ideas and examples of past actions. In order to promote this year’s campaign, we will be using the hashtags #EWWR2019 and #ReduceYourWaste.

How to sign up for the EWWR

In order to move from idea to action, contact your local EWWR coordinator or the EWWR Secretariat (contact [AT] ewwr.eu) to let us know about your intention and/or to ask for help, if you need it. Also, do not forget to access our registration page at www.ewwr.eu/register and follow the five steps delineated below in order to register your action in our database.

This step is crucial in order to enable to EWWR Secretariat to keep track of your action and in order for it to be eligible to win one of our six annual awards. Please note that registrations open on 1 September and close on 8 November 2019!

Webinar | Do Good: Save Food! Educational tools and good practices for schools

This webinar presented the “Do Good: Save Food!” educational package, which promotes food waste reduction in primary and secondary schools. The package was developed by UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and the International Food Waste Coalition (IFWC) and consists of different modules that teachers can use in class and to plan lessons and activities on the issue. It is associated with complementary materials to help kitchen and canteen staff track food waste and implement a comprehensive approach to reduce food waste in schools by connecting with other value chain actors. The materials have already been piloted in schools in Italy, UK, France and Belgium.

This year, education about waste reduction and behavioural change will be the thematic focus of the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR). The webinar aimed therefore to provide an opportunity to learn how to use the educational materials developed by the FAO and IFWC to implement an action for EWWR 2019 and to hear about success stories that have previously been carried out within the framework of the project.

Children are the next generation of adults that will shape the future of food systems. Investing in education will help to create the culture of change necessary to eradicate the problem of food waste and loss once and for all. The FAO and IFWC are currently looking for new partners to implement their programme on a broader scale. Is your local or regional authority willing to improve their food waste prevention measures? Then watch the video recording of this webinar and find out more about this opportunity.

Presentations

Recording

You can watch the recording of the webinar following this link.

EWWR finalists and winners rewarded at landmark Awards Ceremony

On 15 May 2019, ACR+, as the secretariat for the EWWR, welcomed some 150 guests at the annual EWWR Awards Ceremony. Hosted by the European Committee of the Regions (CoR) in Brussels under the umbrella of the EU Green Week, the event gathered top-level policymakers, waste management experts and waste prevention advocates, many of whom participated in the 10th edition of the EWWR in 2018. The occasion was intended to recognise those initiatives carried out as part of the EWWR 2018 that had the biggest relative impact and displayed the most creativity.

Sixteen finalists received trophies and certificates at the ceremony, which was also graced by the presence of speakers Daniel Calleja Crespo, Director General for Environment at the European Commission, Iain Gulland, President of ACR+ and CEO of Zero Waste Scotland , and André van de Nadort, member of the CoR and mayor of Weststellingwerf Municipality in the Netherlands.

The types of actions undertaken by the finalists ranged from citizen science projects to raise awareness about the impact of plastic pollution to ebooks about sustainability and to community library of things. Learn more about them from this comprehensive press file and about the first 10 years of the EWWR from this video.

Pictures of the event are available in our Flickr album.

Meet the #EWWRAwards finalists: #zerofoodbcn DAY. Rallying support to fight against food waste

The meet the #EWWRAwards finalists campaign is coming to an end today with the last of our interviews with the finalists — #zerofoodwastebcn DAY. Gaby Susanna, the mastermind behind this impressive campaign, answered our questions about the action, its impact and its importance. This initiative was shortlisted in the Association/NGO category. Thank you Gaby and thank you, EWWR action developers, for your hard work and inspiration! We look forward to hearing more about your actions in the coming months and years.


By rallying together 150 volunteers, the campaign raised awareness about food waste and resulted in 1,500 free meals made from it
By rallying together 150 volunteers, the campaign raised awareness about
food waste and resulted in 1,500 free meals made from it


1. What did your action consist of?

The #zerofoodwastebcn DAY was a community festive event in which the main action was a free meal for around 1,500 people that was prepared entirely using rescued food that would have otherwise gone to waste (recovered vegetables, fruit and bread).

It took place in Barcelona under the umbrella of the European Week for Waste Reduction. It was a ONE-DAY pop-up event that aimed to 1) call into question existing production, consumption and food supply chains and 2) inspire long-term changes in consumer behaviour and in the other actors in the supply chain. For us, it was the culmination of a long-term effort on raising awareness among all actors in which food is the main protagonist for its value but also the people who make it possible to achieve it.

That weekend, la Pionera (a market of innovative entrepreneur initiatives with a social, environmental and community compromise) where the #zerofoodwastebcn took place, was the loud speaker for both people and entities working for food waste reduction, wise food use culture and zero-waste horizon.

The #zerofoodwastebcn included:

  • A rural gleaning (400kg of green peppers, 13 people)
  • An urban gleaning (from big and small retailers from neighbourhood):133 kg
  • A collection from mercabarna (+1945kg)
  • Donation from “I’m the perfect food” (20 kg)
  • A big retailer collaborated with the condiments for cooking + cleaning
  • The social network (+160volunteers), public administrations and universities participated and got involved
  • the Cett_ub international school for tourism, hotel management and gastronomy, affiliated with the University of Barcelona lead the kitchen (some 40 volunteers + 3 Chefs and managed to make a really good and nutritious meal in a festive “jam session”.
  • Josper collaborated with an grilled oven
  • A smoothie blender
  • Workshops on wise food use at home and in the office with lunch boxes
  • Adoption site
  • 1,500 meals served + donation to social entities and dining canteens

The environmental, economic and media impacts associated with the action were as follows:

  • Quantity of rescued food: 2,443 kg (vegetables, fruit and bread)
  • Economic value/saving: 3,625€
  • CO2 footprint: 2,092 kg CO2eq (the equivalent to 880L gasoline)
  • Water footprint: 202,276L of water (the equivalent to 2529 showers)
  • Ecological footprint: 1,874 m2 of land
  • +20 media impacts/ clippings

2. How did you come across the idea?

Our model was the GlobalFeedback Feedings.

We organised the first one in Barcelona in 2014 (the same year the association was presented to the public) and we realised such events catalysed a positive movement towards food waste reduction.

Since then, we have organised all sorts of feedings in different towns around Catalonia.

The original idea has evolved and we have been engaging more and more people each time. The chefs play a key role and are getting really enthusiastic about tackling the food waste challenge. We have diferent chefs each time.

We start off from the global vision and reach locally. This action is absolutely transversal, and reaches everybody on the street. The whole action is free, open to everybody and empowering.

These festive events allow to create and promote an open-mind and high receptivity atmosphere towards the emotional impact that facilitates the emotional link of the participant to the FW problem and dimension.

3. Why is waste reduction important for you and your organisation?

We believe we urgently need a more responsible, sustainable and fair Food System.

We urgently need a reflection on Foodwaste vs Food as a fundamental Right.

As we say in our manifesto entitled Stop Wasting Food: The people’s right to food is a universal human right of mandatory legal compliance for all states that have ratified the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The current food system model of production, supply, distribution and consumption has been unable to solve the issues of food security and food sovereignty for communities worldwide. Almost 900 million people are poorly and inadequately fed, while obesity affects one third of the industrialised nations’ population.

It is a scandal that huge amounts of food are wasted throughout the world, while there are lots of people experiencing the need for food assistance. Half of the current food losses could feed all the hungry people in the world.

Food losses weaken the economy, make firms less competitive and household’s expenditures bigger, and force public administrations to invest in the management of lost and surplus food.

The environmental effects of food waste are severe: reduction of available fertile land, loss of biodiversity, over-use of water and energy and emissions of greenhouse gases.

FOOD is a treasure. Throwing food away means wasting not just the food itself, but also the natural, technological and the human resources required to make food available to everyone.

Food waste has multiple dimensions and needs an integrated and transversal strategy. This type of event is the best because we manage to reach all the actors in the food-cycle. It is a very complete action that has a lot of awareness raising work embedded in the whole process of organising it. The feeding is just the culmination of all the work done beforehand. The objective is to get as many actors as possible involved.

4. Where can people reach you if they have questions?

GABY SUSANNA

paa [AT] aprofitemelsaliments.org

Facebook and Twitter: @PAAliments

www.aprofitemelsaliments.org

Barcelona, SPAIN

Meet the #EWWRAwards finalists: Col-legi Sant Josep on combining art, sustainability and creativity

Now that you found out who the winners of the EWWR Awards are, we would like to introduce you to the winner of the European Special Prize—the action titled EWWR Sustainable Art Alphabet, which was carried out by Col-legi Sant Josep from Catalonia and its partner schools. Learn more about this action from our interview with Josefina Vendrell Vila, the mastermind behind the project.

The Sustainable Art Alphabet devised by Col-legi Sant Josep and its partner school
The Sustainable Art Alphabet devised by Col-legi Sant Josep and its partner school

What did your action consist of?

“EWWR Sustainable Art Alphabet” is part of an eTwinning project called “WE ARE ART” which started in September 2018 and will end in June 2019. Six Europeans countries are taking part in this project: France, Italy, Greece, Finland, the Netherlands and Spain through Catalonia. As the project is about art, different tasks are scheduled for every month corresponding to a different branch of art.

For example, in March, we worked on poetry because March 21 is the World Poetry Day. Then, in November we worked on music, as Saint Cécile, the patron saint of music, is celebrated in some of the participating countries. We also wanted to enter the EWWR 2018 campaign. That is why we created an action for EWWR, the goal of which was to combine art, sustainability and literacy so that we could spread a message corresponding to each letter of the alphabet all over Europe. The action was developed in a cooperative way, because we split the letters of the alphabet into six, so four or five letters for each country.

Then, our children became the real protagonists when they designed creative letters with a meaningful message for each one. Later on, the students from all the partner countries recorded themselves saying those messages out loud.

Meanwhile, as parts of the project were being completed, the students learned how to upload the material on the eTwinning project platform. Finally, once the letters and messages were completed and they were audio or video recorded, we created an ebook that can be accessed on the project platform.

How did you come up with the idea?

I love art, I love life and nature, I love teaching my students English and I love eTwinning. So I always try to link the tasks I do in class with relevant and real-world situations. Students learn and get much more involved in activities when the task at hand requires real problem solving, observation and creation. It is amazing how creative they can be. And it is also necessary to let them think, discuss and make decisions about the world in which they live and the one in which they want to live in the future.

When devising the schedule of the eTwinning project “ We Are ART” with Cécile, one of the participating partners, last summer, I suggested to her to do this activity in November because Col·legi Sant Josep, the school where I work, usually participates in the EWWR in Catalonia. Last year we also participated in the EWWR with another action that stemmed out of another eTwinning project.

The great added value of the initiative is the cooperation between teachers and students and its international character, which multiplies its impact beyond our school gates and into communities across Europe. Our initiative brought together numerous children, teachers and schools in the pursuit of a common goal.

Why is waste reduction important for you and for Col-legi Sant Josep?

Waste reduction is important to me and Col-legi Sant Josep because we know how important it is to understand that life on Earth depends on us and on our actions. In my opinion, we should not say “Take care of our planet”, but rather that “humans have been destroying and maltreating our planet for years, now it is our duty to save it.“

We are a Green School and the entire community at our school is really sensitive to actions concerning sustainability. Parents, teachers, students and local institutions are working daily to transform their activities in order to make them more sustainable.
This is why I thought that it is very important to spread the message about sustainability, reducing waste and saving the planet while working together with the six European partners on this project. Just like an oil stain expands gradually, we too can spread our influence and actions to fight the climate change and to start a new, healthy era on Earth step by step.

Where can people reach you if they have any questions?

At school! I spend half of my life at school !Col·legi Sant Josep, the pre-primary and primary school. +34938390747
Escola Diocesana de Navàs, the secondary , high and vocational school. +34938390100.

Meet the #EWWRAwards finalists: a different kind of library inspires Cloughmills to reduce waste

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the finalists one by one. Today, we would like you to present to you the initiative undertaken by the Cloughmills Community Action Team. This action has been nominated in the NGO/Associations category.

Cloughmills citizens borrowing items at the library of things
Cloughmills citizens borrowing items at the library of things

What did your action consist of?

We established what we believe to be Northern Ireland’s first Library of Things. This is a mechanism for people to borrow items that might be used infrequently or which they believe might be something they will use regularly but wish to try it before committing to a purchase. We have a selection of items available for borrowing which can be roughly divided into the following categories: homes and kitchen, DIY and cleaning, hobbies and leisure.

Members pay an annual fee of £10 to join and we offer payment plans to facilitate those on limited incomes. All hand tools are free to borrow with the maximum borrowing period being 7 days. Other items are priced according to their original value with the most expensive hire cost being £5 for 7 days. Our Library was designed and built by volunteers, is managed by volunteers and is for the benefit of people of all ages across our community.

We have items available including bread and jam making kits, food mixers, smoothie makers, drills, saws, carpet cleaners, a bicycle and child car seats. We have asked people to donate unwanted items to us and have received a belt sander, some hand tools, two bread makers, a food mixer and a sewing machine! We are challenging traditional consumerism which suggests to people that we need to ‘own’ things.

We are challenging traditional consumerism which suggests to people that we need to ‘own’ things. We suggest to people that we can provide options for either borrowing something that you may only require once a year or alternatively if you are curious about something such as bread making borrow ours to try it out before taking the plunge and buying one. At least then we begin to tackle the build-up of unused or infrequently used items in people’s homes. We also collect batteries at the Library to ensure these are recycled properly. These currently are not collected through our kerbside collection scheme. We believe in community or cooperative approaches and this is a way of bringing people together, starting conversations around how we become a more resilient community, and how by collectively or cooperatively doing or buying things we can increase choices for our community.

To date we have 31 members ranging in age from 19 to 81. Our members range in backgrounds and there have been 69 ‘loans’ in our first 6 months of operation. One member recently commented:
‘I’ve just borrowed a power washer and this isn’t just about not spending money, I feel part of something here and I feel good because I know I don’t have to have one of my own. I have other stuff I don’t really use and I’m going to drop it in for the Library. I can’t believe I can do things like this in my community, it’s great being part of something, its brilliant’

Alongside this we devised a ‘skillshare’ programme where we encourage people within our community to share skills and knowledge. We do this to broaden the impact of the Library and because we know we need to reskill our community and because it’s fun. We operate on a ‘shared learning’ principle in that we know our community possess a huge range of skills but many lack the confidence to ‘teach or tutor’. So, we structure our skillshares around conversations. One example is making bread where we had two people who make bread standing around a table with others mixing dough and chatting – nobody was at the front presenting and everyone contributed. It’s a relaxed way to do things and in our first 6 months 71 people aged from 5 upwards have learned how to make soup, cook Indian food, re-varnish furniture, make giant bubbles with children, make bread and repair a puncture. You do not have to be a member of the Library to participate in the skillshare.

Cloughmills Library of Things is working and is an example of how communities can use sharing and cooperation to make life better and to begin to tackle global issues like consumerism and waste a micro level in a meaningful way which engages people of all ages without the need to use jargon or complicated principles.

How did you come up with this idea?

Our group is volunteer driven, we have no paid staff. For some time we have been developing our thinking around sharing and the sharing economy. As volunteers we share our time and skills for the benefit of others. We organise batch cooking and bread clubs, we purchase food collectively. We have a community or solidarity fridge, which in its first 12 months diverted 3.1 tonnes of food from landfill.

The Library of Things grew out of a conversation some of our volunteers had after we started the Community Fridge. One volunteer suggested that if we were sharing food could we share other things like tools and equipment. This developed into a fuller conversation and some research and after a few months of talking and thinking we began work on our Library of Things. We did look at other ideas around the sharing or solidarity economy from across the world but this is very much a home grown model which suits our volunteers and meets the needs of our community. We wanted this to be more than a tool library and we wanted it to have mass appeal so we have a range of items available to members who pay an annual fee of £10 to join.

Why is waste reduction important for you and for the Cloughmills Community Action Team?

For us there are two aspects to waste, there is the physical material but also the opportunities this presents. We have a track record of delivery sustainable low impact activities. Our community garden is managed according to the permaculture principles of earth care, people care and future care so we understand our obligations to look after this precious planet. We have initiated a water bottle refill scheme and received PlasticSmart accreditation from our local authority for our efforts to reduce single use plastics both amongst our volunteers and the many visitors we have each year.

Our Community Fridge exists to minimise food waste across our community and to encourage people to think about their attitudes at home which may contribute towards food being wasted. The Library of Things is driven by our desire to tackle the amount of ‘stuff’ people own or strive to own. This in turn reduces the financial pressure on people but ultimately reduces the amount of waste ending up in landfill. Our skillshare programme is reskilling people of all ages and is another component in our effort to reduce dependency on buying more ‘stuff’. On a practical level we used some recycled timber to make our Library, the shelves were donated and we have received quite a few donated items. All this is an attempt to reduce or minimise waste locally. We also believe that a simpler, less busy life with less stuff can lead to greater connectivity within the community and enhanced physical and emotional well being or happiness. We can achieve this individually and collectively by striving towards new models of ownership and of cooperative action.

Where can people reach you if they have questions?

Our Facebook page is www.facebook.com/CloughmillsCAT or email:

frewpatrick [AT] gmail.com
declan.donnelly [AT] causewaycoastandglens.gov.uk

Meet the #EWWRAwards finalists: Ildikó Szabó Bozókiné on waste education in pre-school

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the finalists one by one. Today, we would like you to present to you the initiative undertaken by Ildikó Szabó Bozókiné, a pre-school teacher from Csongrád County in Hungary. Her action was nominated in the Citizen(s) category.

Ildikó Szabó Bozókiné teaching pre-schoolers about waste and sustainable consumption
Ildikó Szabó Bozókiné teaching pre-schoolers about waste and sustainable consumption


What did your action consist of?

My initiative consisted in the development of a climate training programme for children, which I named Klimanócska (Climate Elf). Throughout the year, I gathered and organised a comprehensive amount of information about environmental activities involving children, parents, interested stakeholders and affiliated organisations. I then corroborated the material in a booklet. You can see the activities that I carried out as a result of this research on the Climate Elf Facebook page.

For EWWR 2018, I organised activities for children and their parents that consisted of learning games and tools in the Climate Elf Village. The action was developed throughout six days and covered different topics, such as the composting of organic waste, electricity and water use, selective waste collection and environmental conservation.

How did you come up with the idea?

The idea came from my personal commitment and the knowledge that I have and that I have been trying to pass on to my colleagues and to the parents of the children that I teach as much as possible. We integrate environmental policies on a daily basis into our educational work at the preschool. While studying to become a preschool teacher, I reviewed scientific articles and articles concerning different areas of climate strategy.

Using the knowledge I acquired during my training, I developed the “Climate Elf in Action!” programme, which employs the enrichment pedagogy method. The impact of this initiative is very long lasting, because children in whom we instill good habits and attitudes from a young age continue to practice those habits later in life.

Over the past forty years, waste reduction has received a great deal of attention in the European Union, where citizens are increasingly seeking to adopt zero-waste lifestyles in order to counteract climate change and the destruction of the natural environment.

I think that it is very important that the activities included in the “Climate Elf in action!” programme become permanent components of educational curricula. In the kindergarten where I teach, I revised the curriculum myself to make sure that it covers all the important environmental topics.

The easiest way to raise awareness among children is by organising competitions and games that test and help them hone both physical skills, but also their knowledge. Children learning through playing, so the ludic component is very important, particularly since some of the traditional teaching materials are dry and complicated, particularly as they relate to waste management. The latter do not encourage students to identify with the problem and become invested in finding solutions. In contrast, learning through playing provides a more engaging form of education about sustainable waste management.

How did this action contribute to waste reduction?

The objectives of the training programme were the reduction of food waste, energy efficiency, waste reduction, selective waste collection, environmental protection and the empowerment of the local community. The actions carried out as part of the EWWR had the same goals. However, I believe that it is necessary to carry out such actions year round in order for them to be more effective.

The ultimate objective of the initiative was to inspire behavioural change in students insofar as it concerns their approach to consumption and the use of resources. By involving them and their parents, I believe that the impact can be enhanced. After all, entire communities have to change in order for the impact to be more meaningful. Furthermore, it is important to emphasise the benefits of a low-consumption lifestyle, such as financial savings, when presenting the topic to communities.

Where can people reach you if they have questions?

They can reach me via email at szabadsagterovi [AT] heo.hu

Meet the #EWWRAwards finalists: Festive bio-waste weigh ins for the residents of Les Lilas in France

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the finalists one by one. Today, we would like you to present to you the initiative undertaken by two residents of Les Lilas in France - Marina Seder Colomina and Morgane Robert - to collect data about the waste deposited at two bio-waste sites sites in the city while promoting socialising among residents. This action is a finalist in the Citizen(s) category.

Residents of Les Lilas in France depositing their bio-waste at the collection sites
Residents of Les Lilas in France depositing their bio-waste at the collection sites


What did your action consist of?

Our action consisted of a festive weighing of bio-waste. In the town of Les Liles, France, we have set up two bio-waste collection points in Lucie Aubrac Park (opened in September 2015) and Les Sentes (opened in October 2018). Town dwellers have been bringing their bio-waste to these sites since they opened, but we wanted to have a better understanding of their contents. Therefore, in addition to weighing each bucket of waste, we have been asking depositors to complete anonymous questionnaires with details about the composition of their home, the frequency with which they deposit waste, their address and the potential use of the compost (e.g.: whether they have a balcony or a garden).

To date, between the two sites, we have already collected five complete datasets during Composting Weeks 2018 and 2019, which give us a better idea of the environmental impact of waste reduction, what the profile of the depositors is and the composition of the waste.

How did you come up with the idea?

We organised this action to gather data about the amount of bio-waste deposited and the reduction of residual household garbage in our neighbourhoods, as well as to understand the profile of the depositors, the influence of the composts in the city and the uses (if any) of the compost produced. To take it even a step further, we wanted to see what impact our neighbourhood composts could have on the treatment of waste in our municipality, both from an environmental and economic point of view.

Why is waste reduction important for you?

As citizens, we believe that it is necessary to take action to reduce the amount of waste we produce. Composting is part of these efforts, because about a third of our bins are comprised of bio-waste! The neighbourhood collective composts we set up makes it easy enough to successfully compost bio-waste, but also to influence our neighbours in the long term. Constant exchanges with neighbours amplify the message. Thus, aside from the positive environmental aspect, neighbourhood collective compost is a very good motor for social interactions.

Where can people reach you if they have questions?

We are reachable by e-mail: each compost has its own mailing group and referents’ emails are available (msedercolomina [AT] tutanota.com // morganecompostdessentes [AT] gmail.com).

Meet the #EWWRAwards finalists: Opel's factory in Zarragoza on promoting waste as a resource

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the finalists one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the initiative undertaken by Opel’s Zarragoza factory in Aragon, Spain (which is owned by PSA Group) to raise awareness and support of the company’s waste reduction strategy among employees. This action is a finalist in the Business/Industry category.

A representative of the Environment Department at Opel's Zarragoza factory giving a guided tour of the facility's waste management to other employees
A representative of the Environment Department at Opel’s Zarragoza factory giving a guided tour of the facility’s waste management plant to factory employees

What did your action consist of?

Achieving excellence in environmental and energy management requires the involvement of the entire organisation. That is why the PSA Zaragoza manufacturing plant participates in and supports different initiatives to create environmental awareness among employees, contractors, suppliers and students.

We have been participating in the European Week of Waste Reduction (EWWR) since 2012. During the last edition of the event, we organized a series of environmental awareness activities that lasted for the entire week and that combined different waste prevention themes. Among them were:

  • The exhibition “Vidrio es… vidrio será” (“Glass is… glass will be”), which was carried out together with the Government of Aragon, about the recycling of glass;
  • A promotional campaign about paper recycling;
  • A zero-waste meal (non-food waste) served in two canteens at the factory;
  • Collection containers for clothes and textiles set up at the main gates;
  • The collection of plastic caps at the factory;
  • Mobile phone collection at the factory;
  • Video showings about the 3Rs (reduction, reuse and recycling);
  • Information about the EWWR in PSA Zaragoza’s internal newsletter (Informa-T);.
  • A Facebook photo contest;
  • A guided tour of our waste management facility given by the Environmental Team.

Different communication channels were used to reach all our employees:

  • Televisions in all the productive and non-productive areas;
  • Emails to users;
  • Printed posters on the main doors of the factory about all the activities;
  • Exhibition on the main building of the factory;
  • Facebook.

How did you come up with the idea?

PSA Zaragoza´s plant is making great efforts to engage our stakeholders, including our workers, to promote our sustainability agenda.

To ensure landfill-free status and reduce waste, we have developed a strategy that comprises of different stages and one of them is empowering the people working at our facility. Our employees are key to our success. If things are not done properly from the beginning, we will fail. For that reason, we decided to celebrate the EWWR by involving the workers, contractors, suppliers, interns and students at the plant.

Why is waste reduction important for you and your organisation?

For us, waste reduction means safeguarding our land and building a better future for the community in which we operate. It is one of the commitments we make in our Environment and Energy Policy to engage in “actions to preserve and restore the environment. This includes reducing waste and emissions, conserving resources, saving energy and recycling materials at every stage of the product life cycle.”

For this reason, we have defined reduction targets for waste. Employees training and awareness, plus a strong network of recycling partners and suppliers have helped the facility achieve its waste reduction and recycling goals.

Additionally, the PSA Zaragoza production centre has implemented outstanding initiatives that support a strongly circular economy in the field of waste management and industrial symbiosis. In 2014, our company achieved landfill-free status. That means that the waste generated in daily operations is recycled, reused or transformed into energy instead of being sent to landfill for disposal. This was a step further in the plant’s commitment to the environment and sustainability.

Can you give us more information about what it means in practice for a facility to have landfill-free status?

All the by-products that are generated from ongoing, day-to-day operations must be taken into account as part of a landfill-free designation. These include all the episodic and periodic by-products, such as pit cleanouts. To qualify for a landfill-free status, facilities must handle by-products through methods other than landfilling.

All material by-products from worldwide operations must be regarded as resources and therefore useful and marketable. Contractors and suppliers are part of this vision and work together with PSA Zaragoza facilities to first reduce the use of raw materials and then to reuse or recycle every by-product, so that waste can be eliminated. By achieving this vision, facilities reduce or eliminate their dependence on landfills. Opel customers know that we are doing what we can to reduce the impact of PSA Zaragoza facilities on the environment and our dependence on landfills. Additionally, in most instances, these activities can result in operational financial value as well.

To achieve this success, PSA Zaragoza changed its manufacturing process with new technologies and working methods. There were two key changes:

1. Reduction of solvent consumption from its paint shop; it now reuses 70 percent of it.
2. The facility also composts its wastewater treatment sludge to create fertilizer.

Employees training plus having a nearby partner able to efficiently transport and treat paint sludge to generate electricity were the key factors in our success in achieving landfill-free status.

Where can people reach you if they have questions?

Environmental Department: Medio.ambiente [AT] opel.com
Communication Department: comunicacion.interna [AT] opel.com

Meet the #EWWRAwards finalists: IMQ Zorrotzaurre on preventing hazardous chemicals in healthcare

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the finalists one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the initiative undertaken by the IMQ Zorrotzaurre Clinic in the Basque Country in Spain to address the use of chemicals in healthcare establishments. This action is a finalist in the Business/Industry category.



What did your action consist of?

This project Emerging Pollutants arose out of an increased concern about the substances used in medicine shared by both the healthcare and the environmental sectors.

Our project was to develop a methodology that has allowed us to identify the Emerging Contaminants present in our healthcare activities. Together with a team of environmental experts, we have analysed the impact of
34 chemical products used in four medical areas—endoscopy, sterilisation, maintenance and cleaning – in order to identify their chemical components and to prioritise them based on several defined factors.

This project has helped us identify a series of substances that we would like to substitute in the future when their health and environmental impacts are verified and suitable alternatives are found on the
market. Through this chemical substitution, we would like to maintain a balance between our impact on the environment, the health of our workers and the provision of healthcare services to our patients.

How did you come up with the idea?

At the IMQ Zorrotzaurre Clinic and the regional health and public authorities, we were concerned that the discharge of substances commonly used in healthcare in bodies of water could pose a health
and environmental threat, particularly since these substances and their impact have not been researched enough. Currently, traces of such chemicals can be found in wastewater, rivers and other surface and underground streams, where not only aquatic life can be affected, but also humans can themselves be exposed to them through drinking water or the food chain.

Why is waste reduction important for you and your organization?

The excessive generation of waste and its incorrect separation has a great impact not only on the environment, but also on public health. Being committed to environmental conservation, the IMQ Clinics have for many years undertaken activities to preserve energy,streamline material and resource consumption, recycle and separate waste and to raise awareness about these issues in our organization. For instance, we celebrate the World Environment Day every year with targeted awareness raising events.

Since 2011, we have been ISO 14001 certified and have participated in projects with great impact in our community. Among them was the Carbon Footprint initiative, which was promoted by the Bilbao City Council and in which IMQ Zorrotzaurre Clinic was the only medical institution to participate.

Who can people contact you?

If you would like to know more about this initiative, you can contact us at iurrutia [AT] clinica.imq.es.

Meet the #EWWRAwards finalists: a high school in Asturias seeks holistic solutions to waste

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the nominees one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the holistic way in which High School number 1 (IES school number 1) in Asturias, Spain sought to address unsustainable consumption and waste generation through an interview with teacher and project manager Sergio Fernandez Sierra. This action is a finalist in the Educational establishments category.

This high school in Asturias sought to tackle waste holistically
This high school in Asturias sought to tackle waste holistically

What did your action consist of?

Instead of an action, we organised a series of actions taking place during the entire EWWR 2018 week. Overall, approximately 500 students of our school participated in the activities, which are described below:

Monday, November 19. Give your wardrobe a makeover: introduction to the solidary economy. We set up two textile collection containers in our school given to us by the Emaus Social Foundation company, which focuses on social inclusion. Among other things, the company prepares used clothes for reuse and resale in second-hand shops.

The students in our high school attended a talk given by Iris Martín, the manager of Emaus in Asturias, who explained the magnitude of the environmental problems that result from textile manufacturing and the need to increase the percentage of reuse and recycling of textiles. At the end of her talk, students had the chance to ask questions and share their opinions

At the end of the week, we donated the clothes we had collected to Emaus and the two textile containers remain installed in our centre.

On Tuesday, November 20, we organised a viewing of the documentary Albatross by Chris Jordan and we had a roundtable about the impact of plastics on the environment. The representative of SEO Birdlife in Asturias took part in the roundtable, as did the coordinator of the Greenpeace volunteers in Asturias, a member of the Asturias Association for Environmental Sciences (ACASTUR) and myself, as a project coordinator. The roundtable was once again followed by a discussion with the students, who had the chance to ask questions.

On Wednesday, November 21, we organised a day devoted to the reuse and recycling of clothes. Students from the fashion and design track in our high school held a workshop for our freshmen and sophomores, during which they taught them how to give a new life to their clothes. The outcome of the workshop were brooches, cases, bow ties, bags, skirts and various dresses. On Friday, November 23, we exhibited the items in our school library for all the students to see the quality of the resulting objects.

On Friday, November 23, we organised a beach cleanup and educational outing at a nearby beach called Estaño in collaboration with ACASTUR. Divided into teams, the teachers, students and ACASTUR members analysed the fauna, flora and the tides. Taking samples of seawater and the effluents on the beach, they analysed, among others, parameters like the temperature, the pH, and the amount of nitrites and nitrates. The students at our school performed further tests on the samples taken and the data was communicated to ACASTUR for publication, as part of Coastwatch, a European environmental monitoring project. Other teams cleaned up the beach, separately collecting plastic, paper and cardboard, and glass.

How did you come up with the idea?

In general, our high school strives to engage students in activities that help them reflect on our lifestyles and consumption habits and their impact on the environment. Our intention is that the students analyse the status quo and identify solutions to change it for the better. Through this series of actions, we also wanted to take full advantage of our school’s resources and to introduce to our community other actors that participate in waste prevention and in mitigating its environmental impact.

We thought of tackling textiles in order to use the fact that there is a fashion and design track in our school. Since our students are at an age when they are growing, they use clothes for relatively short periods of time. Furthermore, they are pressured by the fashion industry to buy clothes constantly. That is why we wanted to introduce to them alternatives that exist in our city, such as Emaus, which operates a second-hand clothing shop. Besides, we wanted to show them that they can make truly creative and valuable things with the clothes that they no longer valued and to give them an opportunity to reuse some of the items that they no longer thought they needed.

As far as plastic is concerned, we live on the coast, therefore the plastic pollution of the sea is a problem that is literally close to us. Chris Jordan’s documentary is very visual and inspires viewers to empathise with the animals that suffer as a result of our consumption habits. But we did not want to leave the broaching of the topic at that, which is why we held the roundtable with organisations that operate in our community in order for students to understand that this problem affects us locally. Our participation in the Coastwatch project was meant as a step even further, as a demonstration of what can be done in practice to conserve the environment in our town.

As for the specific action that we organised addressing the theme of EWWR 2018—hazardous waste—we wanted to attract the attention of our students and staff to the damaging chemicals in everyday products and to let them question whether using these products is truly necessary. Using our school labs, we demonstrated the contents of cleaning products with various labels in order for students to understand that there are toxic substances outside of the lab as well.

Why is waste reduction important for IES school no. 1?

Schools cannot be allowed to be part of the waste problem; we must become part of the solution. In some classes taught in our school, such as biology and social sciences, students talk about the problems that stem from our poor resource management. At the same time, the management of our own resources at school is perhaps not always exemplary. If we teachers do not place the necessary emphasis on the importance of waste reduction, we will not have the moral authority necessary to educate the future generations and to set an example as far as environmental conservation is concerned.

Before becoming a schoolteacher, I myself studied to be a biologist and environmental educator. I thus had the opportunity to work with the Portuguese association Quercus ANCN and to see first-hand how birds were dying because plastic filled their stomachs and they were not able to feed themselves anymore. My experience in Castelo Branco prompted me to fight for waste reduction wherever I could.

How can people reach you if they have questions?

The project has a blog through which readers can contact the teachers at our school:
http://blog.educastur.es/iesn1haciaresiduocero/

We also have an Instagram account: https://www.instagram.com/eln1haciaelresiduocero/

And the school can also be contacted at:
Website: https://alojaweb.educastur.es/web/iesn1/centro
Telephone: 985 38 31 00
Email: numero1 [AT} educastur.org

Meet the #EWWRAwards finalists: The Gipuzkoa Province Council's artsy response to plastic pollution

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists . The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the nominees one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the action organised by the province of Gipuzkoa in the Basque Country, which sought to address plastic pollution in a very artistic way. This action was a finalist in the public administration category.


What did your action consist of?

The project was developed under the motto “From the sea to the table” #PláscticoAlPilPil (this hashtag is a Basque culinary reference, a typical way to cook the codfish).

The campaign consisted in generating artistic installations made with fishing nets in 31 towns in Gipuzkoa (towns with more than 5.000 habitants) as well as in different neighbourhoods in Donostia (Alza, Amara, Centro and Antiguo) with the objective of collecting discarded plastic bags and bottles for recycling and converting them into polyester fabric to make reusable bags.

This campaign was placed in all selected locations (Donosti, Irun, Errenteria, Eibar, Zarautz, Arrasate, Hernani, Tolosa, Lasarte-Oria, Hondarribia, Pasaia, Bergara, Andoain,Azpeitia, Beasain, Azkoitia, Oñati, Oiartzun, Zumarraga, Zumaia, Ordizia,Legazpi, Aretxabaleta, Urretxu, Usurbil, Urnieta, Lezo, Orio, Villabona, Astigarraga and Deba) at the same time from November 18 to 24.

The artistic installations consisted of a container (pot) made of rectangular fishing nets that were 1.5 metres wide and 3 metres long. The public was able to provide plastic bags and bottles to be discarded and put in the container. The net has several functions:

  • It allows the introduction of bags and bottles made from plastic;
  • It prevents them from spilling out;
  • It allows people to see how the contributions of bag and bottles increases and encourages them to contribute more to the pile;
  • It allows people to post messages with tips and data about prevention examples that are applicable in daily life.

Once the European Week for Waste Reduction was over, the recovered plastics were processed and recycled by EkoRec (a Gipuzkoan company specialized in the recycling of PETs), which transformed them into fibres. The Sin Desperdicio brand (a Gipuzkoan company specialised in the making of accessories from recycled materials) used the resulting fibres to make bags and reusable shopping trolleys. The Emaus Foundation, which promotes social transformation through social inclusion and a social and solidarity economy, designed the items.

The bags and shopping trolleys created this way will be raffled using social media among the Guipuzkoans who have contributed to the plastic collection in the province. To participate, they had to take a photo of themselves depositing plastic material and upload it to social media using the aforementioned hashtag.

Collecting plastic bottles in Gipuzkoa
Collecting plastic bottles in Gipuzkoa

How did you come up with the idea?

We are all aware that the problem of plastic pollution in our seas is increasingly worrying because, as experts point out, by 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in the oceans if we do not make changes. That is why we should not look the other way; it is time to act. Local and regional actors have a lot of influence and we can help solve this global problem. We must think globally and act locally.

The aim of this action was to show the public the importance of selective collection and subsequent recycling of plastic; to explain
to them the problem of the plastic that is abandoned and it breaks down into microplastics in our seas and oceans; only to end up being ingestedby the fish that we later eat ourselves.

The Basque region is well known for its fishing tradition, so we decided to focus on this problem using artistic installations with a
container (pot) made of fishing nets to raise awareness that this is a local problem everywhere around the world.

Why is waste reduction important for you and your organization?

The Province Council of Gipuzkoa has various competences, ranging from culture and tourism, to youth and sports; governance and public communication; economic development, the rural environment and territorial balance; mobility and planning; public revenue and finance; road infrastructure; social policies; and environment
and water engineering.

This awareness campaign reflected the content of the policies (Directive 2018/851 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 May 2018 amending Directive 2008/98/EC on waste), strategies, plans and programs that are being carried out by the European Union.

Where can people find you if they have questions?

https://www.gipuzkoa.eus/es/

Meet the #EWWRAwards Finalists: La Louvière's zero waste week

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists . The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the nominees one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the action organised by the municipality of La Louvière in Belgium to promote zero waste among local residents. The action has been nominated in the Public administration category.

Zero waste cooking workshop in La Louvière
Zero waste cooking workshop in La Louvière

What did the action you organised consist of?

For several years, the City of La Louvière has committed to implementing a responsible policy of waste reduction by investing in actions and awareness campaigns to promote prevention, re-use and recycling.

Thus, in the context of the EWWR 2018 and just like in previous years, the Environment Department has proposed to provide information, advice and tips to enable citizens to produce less waste when shopping without trading off their comfort.

To do this the Environment Department organised the campaign La LouvièR³ week: zero waste objective! that included different parts:

1. Primary schools :

The City of La Louvière organised a “Zero Waste Week at School!” activity from November 19 to 23 in municipal schools. First, from November 5 to 9 (reference week), students didn’t change their habits, but the quantities of waste were checked and summarised in a table. Second, during the European Week of Waste Reduction, each student from the participating classes was adked to come to school with the least possible waste. From a practical standpoint, the teacher checked each morning the schoolbag of each student to assess the amount of waste per student. These quantities were then included in a table and compared to the reference week. At the end, each student that participated in this week received a gift: a reusable straw.

Overall, 10 schools with a total of 1,329 students took part in the project. We observed an average decrease of 39.3%
in the total waste production between the reference week and the EWWR.

2. Citizens component:

To mark the EWWR 2018, we organised various activities for citizens.

Thus, on November 17, the Environment Service organised an Awareness Stand at the local market, which reached 100 people. We also organised workshops about natural cosmetics on November 17 and 26 to teach attendees how to make products like deodorants, shower gels, tooth pastes and face masks from natural ingredients. This activity had a total of 39 participants. On November 19 and 22, we organised another workshop – about household products, which taught the 31 participants how to make multi-use cleaning products the natural way.

We also organised a zero-waste cooking lesson, which was attended by 21 people and which featured a professional chef that gave tips about sustainable cooking habits (e.g.: how to peel vegetables, using fruit and vegetables that are in season, etc).

On November 21, we also organised two waste sewing workshops: one to teach participants how to make bee wrap and tawashi and a second to teach them how to make bulk bags, make-up removers, baby wipes and towels. These two workshops had 35 participants.

We decided to extend the week a bit until November 28 and were able to wrap it up with a talk about Zero Waste Families by Jérémie Pichon, who is the “daddy” of the zero-waste family. The event was free of charge.

3. ‘Plastic is dramatic’ waste reduction guide

In order to ensure that our initiative was properly communicated, we added a Waste Reduction Guide in the local newsletter. The theme was “Plastic is dramatic” to encourage alternatives to plastic and especially the decrease the use of plastic straw.

4. Salon c’est Bon, c’est Wallon

In order to open the hostilities and launch an assault on waste, the Environment Service was invited to manage the discovery space of the Salon c’est Bon, c’est Wallon held on November 10 and 11 November.

The opportunity to promote zero waste was immediately obvious to us. The 60m² dedicated to the City of La Louvière were therefore used to highlight local zero-waste merchants, but also to recreate a practical space of demonstration for zero waste where those interested could make washing products. Furthermore, we also had a conference area, where Sylvie Droulans came to share her experience as a zero-waste family and to promote her book “zero carabistouille”. Almost 300 people came to our booth. A real success!

How did you come up with the idea?

This project has been long in the making. La Louvière has been active in the field of waste prevention since 2000. It has always targeted three stakeholder groups: citizens, schools and administration. In order to inspire behavioural change in these groups, the Environment Service:

- communicates and informs through monthly articles in the municipal newsletter, guides on waste reduction and other channels

- raises awareness through animations for children, shows and stands during events, among others

- trains through workshops about composting and other topics

- implements specific projects responding to citizens’ initiatives or specific themes.

The idea to organise the “La LouvièR³ week: zero waste objective!” was crystallised gradually, based on our experiences with different activities. Our aim was to promote waste reduction by accentuating waste prevention during a week.

Why is waste reduction important for La Louvière?

Waste reduction is important for the city of La Louvière because it limits the impact of waste on the environment by encouraging citizens to change their habits in a sustainable way. Waste prevention enables the avoiding of environmental impacts related to waste treatment, but also intervenes upstream of the product life cycle. It can reduce health impacts associated with the production and management of many waste streams and covers all the stages of the product life cycle. Waste reduction also allows citizens to have a better quality of life by improving health and financial outcomes.

Where can people reach you if they have questions?

Website: https://www.lalouviere.be/ma-ville/services-communaux/environnement/zero-dechet

E-mail: zerodechet@lalouviere.be

Phone: +32 064/277.811

Meet the #EWWRAwards Finalists: Sant Vicenç de Castellet on healthy and sustainable school meals

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists . The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the nominees one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the action organised by the municipality of Sant Vicenç de Castellet in Spain to promote healthy and sustainable meals in local schools. The action has been nominated in the Public administration category.



What did your action consist of?

Our project consisted of promoting healthy and sustainable meals in schools in order to reduce the amount of food and packaging waste generated and to ensure that children eat healthier by avoiding processed food, preservatives, processed sugar and trans fats.

The project was carried out in all the primary schools in our municipality, targeting approximately 600 students, and benefited from the involvement of parents’ associations, management teams and the local health centre. Its implementation took place in various stages:

In the preparatory stage, we devised a Decalogue of the ten commandments of a healthy and sustainable snack for families, good practice handbooks for the reduction of waste and we set the bases for our Instagram competition. We also held
informative meetings with the families in the participating schools to explain the campaign, its implementation and to invite parents to get involved.

In the first phase, we benchmarked the amount of waste that was being produced in each of the 26 participating classes with the help of the “Basureto” (“basura” means rubbish in Spanish) clown.

In the second phase, we held workshops on sustainable and healthy meals with each of the 26 groups of students. These were carried out in conjunction with the environmental teacher and a public health nurse, who helped us analyse meals in terms of nutrition and waste generated. During this activity, we handed out to every student a reusable food pack (snack’n’go pack) to motivate families to avoid disposable packaging and the Decalogue of the sustainable and healthy snack with all the information necessary about recommended snacks. Our objective was that students would develop the habit of using the snack’n’go pack and that it would become a staple in their schoolbags.

Instagram competition #svcresiduzero: Was targeted at the families of the students, who could upload photos of healthy and sustainable snacks. In total, 112 photos were submitted.

The third phase consisted of a final evaluation of the waste reduction resulted from this action, which averaged 33% across the participating schools.

How did you come up with the idea?

The city hall of Sant Vicenç de Castellet has been organising actions for the EWWR for many years in order to create awareness among residents about waste reduction. The majority of the actions we have organised, although they were addressed at the general public, have not attained the long-last impact that we expected in terms of leading to
behavioural change.

Therefore, we decided to target this event directly at the 600 students and their families through schools, which serve as a reference for the latter.

The students spend between one and six years in the same school. Therefore, this was an opportunity for us the inspire new habits and reinforce them by following up in the medium term. We believe that the ages we targeted are propitious for behavioural change, which students will be able to take with them in the next stages of their lives – adolescence and adulthood.

Why is waste reduction important for the municipality of Sant Vicenç de Castellet?

We are at a point in time when urgent measures need to be taken in order to mitigate climate change. Public authorities like ours have the responsibility of serving as role models. Waste reduction and good nutrition have numerous environmental benefits, such as the reduction in the use of natural resources and raw materials, energy efficiency, the reduction in the environmental impact of manufacturing plants and landfills and, also, better health.

Where can people reach you if they have questions?

Ajuntament de Sant Vicenç de Castellet

Address: Plaça de l’Ajuntament, 10, 08295 Sant Vicenç de Castellet (Barcelona)

Telephone: +34 936 93 06 11

Email: svc.mediambient [AT] svc.cat

Website: www.svc.cat/serveis/medi-ambient/

Meet the #EWWRAwards Finalists: Polish Zero Waste Association on Reusable Diapers

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists . The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the nominees one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the action organised by the Polish Zero Waste Association to promote reusable diapers in the country through a Q&A with volunteer Sylwia Sikorska.



What did the action you organised consist of?

We organised 25 workshops on reusable diapers in 22 cities in Poland. Additionally, we had six live streams on Facebook about the different aspects of using cloth diapers and we promoted them in 30 online stores.

How did you come up with the idea?

I tried to use cloth diapers with my older daughter but, because of the lack of proper information, I failed. With my second child, I did better research and I was successful.

However, I learned that there are many misconceptions about cloth diapers, which are the result of a lack of knowledge about the subject. Some of them are very misleading and not fair. I wanted to change that and show parents that reusable diapers are more ecological, cheaper and healthier for children.

When I met a few activists, I realized that we must join forces and, with the help of the Polish Zero Waste Association that I was already a member of, we educated parents using social media.

Why is waste reduction important for you and your organisation?

The mission of our organisation is to promote zero waste. We want to create a world without waste and educate Poles about waste reduction.

Where can people reach you if they have questions?

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/HelloWielo

Email: Sylwia.sikorska [AT} zero-waste.pl

Telephone: +48 506 44 55 59

Meet the #EWWRAwards Finalists: Green cleaning at St Fintan's School

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists . The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the nominees one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the action organised by St Fintan’s School in Dublin, Ireland, which undertook a “Green Cleaning” campaign at part of EWWR 2018. St Fintan’s is a finalist in the Educational establishment category at the EWWR Awards.


Students at the “Green Cleaning” work station in St Fintan’s School
Students at the “Green Cleaning” work station in St Fintan’s School

What did your action consist of?

Fintan’s National School participated in making “Green Cleaning” products during the EWWR. We introduced the project at the beginning of the school term [September], explaining that we planned to make our own cleaning products with non-hazardous ingredients and, to also reduce our waste, we would repurpose empty containers.

We asked the students to begin collecting containers for the month of October, as in Ireland this is “Reuse Month”, which is a National Campaign run by the Regional Waste Management Offices. The non-hazardous ingredients required were purchased from a “Minimal Waste Grocery Store”.

We communicated to parents via a WhatsApp group; the pupils made posters, which were displayed on the worktops and the hallways. We borrowed equipment, such as protective eye-wear, science coats, gloves and funnels, from the science class of a local secondary school. This made it a fun, dress-up event and generated a lot of interest and questions.

During the EWWR, a workstation was set up in the school corridor, where the children conducted the project with the aid of the parents who volunteered to assist. All pupils in the school who passed the project area were amused by the workshop and all the equipment involved.

The finished products were tested in the classroom by the students and they had the opportunity to take products home to introduce “Green Cleaning” into their homes. Ingredients used included: lemons, white vinegar, essential oils, baking soda, citric acid and washing up liquid. This created a long lasting fun and educational memory, children learned about the ingredients, the effects when combined and how getting back to old traditional ways can be relatively easy.

How did you come up with the idea?

Cleaning products have “Warning & Hazard” signs. We felt that while being clean was important; safety and nature were just as critical. We had previously seen that one of our County Councils had made available a range of six stickers that included the ingredients and directions to make green cleaning products. We thought it would be a wonderful way to introduce a green cleaning and waste reduction campaign to our school.

Why is waste reduction important for you and your organisation?

The aim of the project was to increase awareness about waste reduction, reuse and the dangers of unnecessary, potentially hazardous cleaning products. The ultimate objective was that the children, along with their parents, would be empowered to create change within their homes and that they would become more aware of how much waste we produce, how we can easily embrace reuse and understand the waste hierarchy.

Where can people reach you if they have questions?

They can email us at info@stfintansns.ie.

If you would like to make your own cleaning products you can find the instructional videos that we used here.

Meet the #EWWRAwards Finalists: Daniela Malanchini on friendly coffee breaks

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists . The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the nominees one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the action organised by Daniela Malanchini and Denise Castro, who live in the Azores Islands in Portugal. The initiative, called “Coffee Break”, was nominated for an award in the Citizen category.


Daniela Malanchini and Denise Castro next to the Coffee Break display
Daniela Malanchini and Denise Castro next to the Coffee Break display

What did your action consist of?

We all know what a coffee break is. It is a recess in the middle of a meeting, a conference or a presentation to give the participants the opportunity to have a chat, to relax and to recharge while sipping on a good cup of coffee or tea or drinking a soft drink accompanied by a snack. While it may sound very nice and innocent, in reality these recesses are extremely sad and bad! Most coffee breaks feature coffee made by machines that use plastic capsules, which is served in plastic cups and sweetened with sugar that comes in plastic sachets, which is then stirred with plastic spoons or spatulas. The biscuits come packaged in plastic and are tasteless; even the soft drinks are usually industrially produced, contain dubious ingredients and come in plastic bottles or packs. That is to say nothing of the paper napkins. In short: coffee breaks are the source of mountains of garbage. At my house, I would never offer my guests such things.

My friend and I decided that it was time to put a stop to all this in our town. We involved the municipality, which immediately approved the project by making available the municipal library, which is the place where our small island community of 5,000 meets and holds conferences. There, we set up two tables: one with the products commonly used during coffee break, which we called “past coffee breaks “ because our town hall assured us that they will no longer organise such breaks; and the other with the products used in the coffee break “of the future”.

We thought of also involving the older generation in this activity. Everybody always says that the future is in the hands of the new generations, but, for us, our future is also in our past. Elderly community members were asked to decorate a table in the classical way, how it was done before the advent of plastic. Thus, the women embroidered doilies with the names of traditional biscuits that were home made on the express order of the town hall. The men carved spoons in bamboo and made twisted baskets from recycled paper straws. The water was served in recycled bottles and came from the tap. Hot drinks were served in thermoses and the tea had come from the Azores (which is the only European region that produces tea). The food was produced locally and all the accessories — cups, plates, napkins and others — were washable and reusable. The impact was great and positive and we are happy because this small and simple action is now undoubtedly part of everyday life for us. By the two tables we added panels written on recycled paper, with an explanation of the EWWR thematic focus for 2018: hazardous waste prevention. Our simple motto is: Small gestures, great changes!

How did you come up with the idea?

In general, I am a proactive person who seeks to remedy wrongs when I notice them. This is what I am like when it comes to projects as well. My projects are born noticing room for improvement around me. In this particular case, I participate in many events and have observed that the coffee break is always the meeting point, the break where we gather with the other participants in a given event to chat. I consider the world to be my home and I know that, at home, I would never invite a friend to drink coffee in a plastic cup or offer commercial cakes or biscuits. The usual “sad” coffee break disturbed me and I knew exactly how I would have liked it to be: I wanted it to be friendly. Friendly to all: not only to the people, but also to nature, to the environment, to our beautiful planet. I wanted a break during which one could really recharge the mind and the heart, be amazed like children are at simple things, happy to be together and where participants could copy ideas and bring them into their daily lives. But, in order to change coffee breaks, I needed to organise one myself coffee break. The town hall of Santa Maria — the island where I live — is always very cooperative and immediately accepted to support my idea, promising that future events would feature the type of coffee break that I envisioned.

But I also needed people who could help me turn my vision into reality, because I have a lot of ideas, but I’m not good at putting them into practice! My friend Denise, who had already helped me a lot the previous year with the implementation of the project ‘’An entire island for the nature’, immediately expressed her interest and availability. Not only that, but she involved the greatest contribution to our project, who were the group of elderly citizens that are accustomed to working with their hands.

Ultimately, the action consisted of all these simple very simple actions that have zero impact and which were made easy thanks to the collaboration of institutions and the participation of community members. Together we are very strong!

Why is waste reduction important for you?

Waste reduction is important to me because, nowadays, we produce almost more waste than food and it is disastrous for the environment! In a short time, the world and the oceans will be so invaded by indestructible refuse, that life will disappear. I am also an animal lover and spend much time near the sea, so it is terribly painful to me to know that animals, sea mammals and fish are dying because of our negligence.

While I am just a citizen, I have always counted on the community of the small island I call home. Last year, the action I helped organised (which was also an EWWR finalist), was carried in collaboration with 63 different stakeholders, ranging from schools to sports clubs, merchants, the police, NGOs and citizens.

Talking to people, to old friends and to future friends, is how I share my ideas, my visions, my dreams and my projects. I believe in a better world and I am convinced that, together, we can really make a difference. Perhaps my enthusiasm, my simplicity and my ingenuity are contagious, because the people to whom I propose environmental projects are usually eager to participate. People should agree that it is time to roll up our sleeves and become actors in a new revolution. A revolution aiming to change mentalities and behaviour, to reduce the production of garbage, which is important for everyone and especially for those of us who live on small islands.

My project is to contribute to this revolution through very simple every day gestures that all institutions and citizens worldwide can put into practice.

Where can you be reached?

Nowadays, everyone is connected via social media. However, I am an email person. So if you write to me at my email address malanchini.daniela [AT] gmail.com, I would be happy to answer any questions.

Meet the #EWWRAwards Finalists: the ALP School in Malta on waste cooking oil



The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists . The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. In the days and weeks to come, we will introduce you the nominees one by one. Today, we would like you to present you the action organised by the ALP school in Malta, as described by teacher and organiser Catherine Polidano. The initiative was nominated for an award in the Educational establishment category.


What did the action that you organised consist of?

Our action for the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) 2018 aimed to produce a clear and engaging message about how to dispose of waste cooking oil in a simple way, without harming the sewerage system, water treatment systems and the environment. Moreover, we wanted to reach as many of Malta’s 63,000 households as possible.

To this end, we undertook an initiative that focused on understanding people’s behaviour towards waste cooking oil and raising awareness about its correct disposal. First, we sought went to our town square and interviewed community members about their disposal of waste cooking oil. We then produced an informative video and did a write-up on its correct disposal.

We then formulated and implemented a strategy on how to maximise the dissemination and impact of our message. We organised an informative assembly for the three hundred students and one hundred staff members in our school. We appointed them ambassadors of our message and urged them to spread the message in their homes.

The Maltese Minister for Education helped spread our message through his Twitter account. We drafted engaging articles, which were sent and featured on various social media platforms, including the Facebook page of the Malta Ministry for Education, which has over 40,000 followers. We undertook a persistent PR campaign so that national TV stations, radios, newspapers and online news portals featured our awareness raising articles and video link. The Malta Department of Information sent our message through the Malta Government Intranet to over 37,000 public service employees. Malta’s sixty-eight local councils collaborated by emailing our message to their subscribed residents.

We wanted to target specifically people who like to cook. So we contacted TV cooking celebrities, who publicised our message during their broadcast programmes, on online gourmet platforms and on social media cooking-related pages.

How did you come up with the idea?

The Alternative Learning Programme School is a school which offers vocational (mainly technical) hands-on courses for students between the ages of fifteen and seventeen. ‘Learning by doing’ is the school’s ethos in a nutshell.

We offer about twenty five vocational courses and one of them is Multimedia and IT Applications. In this course, students learn about video production and photography. Another school aim is to embed basic social values in learning and to give meaning to what we do by focusing on the realities of our students, our communities and society.

For this reason, a Multimedia teacher and her students decided to apply learning by doing by producing a feature which would help people learn how to dispose of waste cooking. We started to raise awareness by going to the town square and speaking with people about this issue. We researched the harm that waste cooking oil does. Together with the Drama team, the students prepared the video script and produced the video with the help of the Multimedia teacher.

Once ready, it was time to spread the message. The Action Developer helped formulate and implement a strategy to maximise the dissemination of our message.

Why is waste reduction important for you and your organisation?

As a school, we strive to uphold our responsibility to instill environmental values in our students.

It is important to do so, as the students will, in turn, help instill waste reduction values in their present and future families.

We are aware that, to mitigate climate change and resource depletion, schools have the moral duty to convey to their students the importance of waste reduction, reuse and recycling.

Additionally, we aim to share our good environmental practices so as to inspire and help other schools reduce waste generation and adopt environmentally responsible school practices.

Where can people reach you if they have questions?

At the address below:

Action Developer: Catherine Polidano

School Address: ALP School, Guze D’Amato Street, Paola, PLA 1248

School Email: alp.paola@ilearn.edu.mt

Meet the #EWWRAwards Finalists: Resid'ÚS on the symbiosis between business and school

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category, the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 15 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. We caught up with Alba Bosch, founder of the social enterprise Resid’ÚS, which has been nominated for an award in the Business/Industry category.


What is Resid’ÚS?

We are a zero-waste social enterprise based out of Catalonia that focuses on providing employment to women at risk of social exclusion, while promoting alternatives to disposable products and packaging and fostering the circular economy.

In brief, what did the waste reduction action that Resid’ ÚS implemented as part of EWWR 2018 consist of?

Our action consisted, first, of a call to gather glass containers from the students at a public school in our city, Girona. It was a very successful call, as we gathered many, many glass containers of different sizes. We then cleaned all of them and proceeded to implement the action at three stores that are part of a local frozen yogurt (froyo) chain, Llagurt. The chain sells froyo with toppings in disposable containers which customers consume mostly as takeaways. As part of the EWWR 2018, they offered their customers the possibility to have their froyo served in glass jars, rather than disposable paper or plastic containers, which is how they normally serve their products. To that end, they used the jars that the students collected.

How did you come up with the idea?

Seeing how we are a zero-waste enterprise, when we heard that the EWWR was coming up, we thought that we had to organize something. Our scope also includes awareness raising and advocacy, so we found this to be the perfect opportunity to undertake such an action.

The local EWWR coordinator, the Catalan Waste Agency, has very detailed factsheets and a lot of literature about past actions, including spreadsheets with tips about how to replicate past actions or to find inspiration for new one. So what I did was first to read all this material to see what was good and bad about past actions. I then sought to understand what were the needs of my city based on what I observed in my daily life. It was really important for me to organize an activity that involved many different actors. I identified the businesses that were producing a lot of waste in Girona and where the takeaway places were.

Froyo made sense because it is a product that is consumed very quickly. Since it is eaten very fast, customers can easily return reusable containers to the shop. It does not pose a great hassle for the client.

In terms of collecting glass jars, it was obvious that we all buy a lot of products that come in jars that we then no longer need. So the easy way to collect them was to just ask families that no longer need the jars anymore. And how can one reach a lot of families? Through schools. Besides, in Catalonia, there is a designated teacher that teaches students about nature. By contacting them, it is easier to organise a collection campaign, as well as waste reduction activities to help the children learn about the 3Rs, for example.

What challenges did you confront along the way?

The most difficult aspect was to ensure that we provided glass jars of standardised size that matched the size of the disposable containers that Llagurt used. The business was very strict about the fact that the reusable containers had to be the same size as their disposable ones, because otherwise clients could have found it disadvantageous to use glass containers, especially if they looked smaller. But this challenge was easily overcome, because we had collected many jars.

The second challenge was ensuring that customers understood why it was important for them to choose the reusable containers. During peak times, when there were long queues, it was difficult to give clients comprehensive explanations about waste reduction. And part of the aim of the campaign was to increase their awareness about the topic in general.

What did you make of the outcome of the action?

We were very happy with the outcome. As far as we know, there had been no similar activity in past years, so we did not know what to expect from the action.

One of the things we noticed was that one of the locations was more successful than the other two. That was because that location also had a seating area. Since froyo is something that can be eaten quickly, customers noticed that they could sit at the table, consume it and then give the containers back. In the other two shops, the seating area was very small and most customers took the froyo to go. So it was more of a hassle for them to come back to return the jar.

It was useful to observe the behaviour of clients who buy these products. For next year, we know what to improve and what other businesses to target, as we would like to continue with this action in the following years.

Lastly, what is next for Resid’ÚS?

As a zero-waste enterprise, we are trying to diversify our portfolio in order to put on the market alternatives to single-use products that are locally produced. Right now, there are few zero-waste producers in Spain. Having identified the gap in the market, we want to fill it. We also want to make sure that consumers are aware of the fact that substitutes to single-use products exist outside of mainstream supermarkets and shops.

We are also looking forward to the next EWWR, as we intend to repeat the action and target more businesses.


Find out more:

Website: https://zeroresidus.com/

Social media: Twitter | Facebook

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

The EWWR 2018 finalists have been selected!

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) is excited to announce the names of the EWWR Awards finalists, selected from the over 14,000 inspiring actions implemented during the EWWR 2018.

On 25 March 2019, the EWWR Awards Jury gathered in Brussels to select three finalists for each category of the EWWR Awards, out of the 82 actions submitted by EWWR Coordinators. All the winners will be revealed during the EWWR Awards Ceremony hosted in Brussels, Belgium on 15 May 2019. The event is part of the EU Green Week taking place from 13 to 17 May 2019.

In the meantime, read our press release to find out who the finalists of the EWWR Awards are and who were the experts that constitute the EWWR Awards Jury this year.

Don’t miss out and join us on 15 May in Brussels at the EWWR Awards Ceremony! Book your place here.

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to get the latest updates.

Save-the-date for the EWWR Awards Ceremony on 15 May!

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) is preparing its annual celebration: the EWWR Awards Ceremony. The event, hosted by the European Committee of the Regions, will take place at 9:45 am on 15 May in Brussels, in the framework of the EU Green Week. On this date, the EWWR will celebrate the most oustanding actions on waste reduction organised during the the EWWR 2018. This is a wonderful opportunity to put the spotlight on some of the EWWR’s most innovative, effective and long-lasting actions raising awareness on waste prevention, and to recognise the hard work of the Action Developers across Europe that makes the EWWR possible.

Registrations are open until 5 May 2019.

Join us for the EWWR Awards Ceremony and be the first to discover the winning actions in each category: Public Administration, Association/NGO, Business, Educational Establishment, and Citizen. In addition, a European Special Prize will also be attributed to the action that best contributed to the European spirit. To get a glimpse of the previous edition’s winners, read last year’s press file here.

Download the agenda

For more information about the Awards process and the EWWR jury, have a look at our page: www.ewwr.eu/en/ideas/awards.

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook @ewwr.eu & Twitter @2EWWR to get the latest updates about the event and the finalists!

Video published to mark 10 years of the EWWR!

The 2018 edition of the European Week for Waste Reduction was the 10th edition of the pan-European awareness-raising campaign. To mark this historic milestone, a video presenting some of the highlights on this journey has been created…

10 years of EWWR
10 years of EWWR

The video, which contains a sample of the actions that took place this year but also over the past 10 years, illustrates the exceptional diversity of the EWWR, which has grown every year since it began - reaching ever further and expanding its horizons. This year - citizens, public authorities, NGOs, businesses, and educational establishments from across Europe and beyond mobilised to carry out actions.Take a look to cast your gaze back over the history of the EWWR, to relive some of its memories and see just how far it has come!

You can also view pictures from the latest edition in this flickr album, or clips from various different actions in our 2018 playlist.

The project was launched in 2009 as a 3-year project supported by the LIFE+ Programme of the European Commission, and was subsequently renewed in 2013. In 2017, the EWWR entered a new phase as it became financed through a European steering committee.

Although the EWWR has undergone considerable growth and changes throughout the past 10 years, its core mission has remained the same: to contribute to waste prevention and reduction at source across Europe and beyond, by encouraging and supporting the implementation of awareness-raising actions. In this sense, it has been a trailblazing initiative, acting upon the evidence that our consumption and production patterns lead to unsustainable levels of waste, and reaching out to citizens, organisations and policy-makers across Europe to bring about change, long before before the topic became widely-discussed in civil society and high on the political agenda.

Over the past 10 years the EWWR has gone from strength to strength, reaching millions of people across more than 40 countries, and preventing thousands of tonnes of waste from being generated. It has tackled specific challenges such as packaging waste, reuse and repair and food waste. There has been a steady increase in the number of actions, countries, coordinators, action developers. The first edition in saw 2,672 actions implemented in 14 countries, while this year’s EWWR saw over 14,000 actions organised across 30 countries.

Record number of actions registered for EWWR 2018

For the 10th edition of the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR), which took place from 17 to 25 November 2018, a new record of 14,347 actions related to waste reduction, product reuse and materials recycling, as well as clean-ups were carried out across 30 countries in Europe and beyond. This new edition is another success showing that over the past 10 years the EWWR has gone from strength to strength, with a steady increase in the number of actions, countries, coordinators, and action developers. This year the EWWR even reached Morocco and saw the first actions implemented there, thanks to the involvement of Rabat Municipality as a coordinator.

Each year, the EWWR offers a special focus on waste prevention via the Thematic Focus. For this edition, the chosen topic was “Hazardous Waste Prevention: Time to Detox!”. Hazardous waste poses a greater risk to our health and our environment when compared to other types of waste. Thus, it is even more important to reduce our consumption of products with hazardous contents as well as make sure that they are properly disposed of. 100 million tonnes of hazardous waste are generated each year, a fifth of which comes from households. That is why this year the EWWR encouraged Action Developers to think about ways to detox and diminish the use of such products in their nearest surroundings such as bathrooms, kitchens, sheds and garages. Discover some of the exciting actions in our 2018 database of actions!

Webin@r Training Session 10 - 7 September 2018

On 7 September 2018, the EWWR held its 10th training session online.

This training session focused on some of the winning awareness-raising actions of the 9th European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) Awards. Action Developers presented some of the best practices for waste prevention, reuse and recycling implemented during the EWWR 2017 across different categories. The actions covered a great range of topics, from campaigns to reduce single-use coffee cups to a school project on orthopaedic and medical devices made of reused materials. The presentations sought to give some insights into the organisation of the actions, the participants’ involvement and useful tips on how to set up a successful action.

Additionally, the participants were able to learn more about the focus of the EWWR in 2018. With the slogan “Time to Detox!”, this year’s edition will focus on the topic of hazardous waste prevention. However, you are still more than welcome to organise your action on another topic.

The presentations were followed by the opportunity to ask the Action Developers questions, which revealed the participants interest in the topic and the enthusiasm of the winners.

You can download all presentations and recordings of the webinar here. If these outstanding actions have sparked your imagination, we invite you to register your own action for the EWWR 2018 until 9 November!

Got a bright idea about how to reduce waste? Register your EWWR action now!

Registration is now open for actions as part of this year’s European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) – the largest awareness-raising campaign on waste reduction in Europe.

Waste is a critical problem across the world today. In Europe, the average citizen generates around 482 kg of waste – and less than half of that is reused, composted or recycled. We know we can do better than this, which is why we’re looking for innovative ideas for actions focusing on the “3Rs”: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. Actions of all kinds are welcome, conferences, contests, exhibitions or information campaigns, as long as it aims to raise awareness of waste reduction and make a real difference.

This year we’re setting our sights on Hazardous Waste – the toxic and harmful substances hiding in our cleaning products, pesticides, and electronics that threaten both our health and the environment. It’s “Time to Detox” by cutting down our use of these products, or kicking them out entirely! Find out more about hazardous waste and how to avoid it here. Of course, you are always free to pick another waste prevention topic.

Do you have some fresh ideas on what could make a positive change? If you are a public authority, association, NGO, business, educational establishment or an individual, you can register an action until the 9th of November. Simply follow this link www.ewwr.eu/register, complete your registration, get access to all the EWWR Communication tools, and start planning your action. You can also check our website to see all the actions taking place and participate in one happening near you.

The EWWR will take place between the 17th and 25th of November 2018. For further information visit the EWWR website. Should you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact the EWWR Secretariat.

We’re looking forward to seeing your ideas turn into initiatives in November!

Let’s Clean Up Europe 2018: a successful campaign gathers more than 800,000 participant

A record number of 16,447 actions were organised in the span of a 4-month period during this year’s Let’s Clean Up Europe! (LCUE) campaign. Held between 1 March and 30 June 2018, it united at least 800,000 participants under one goal - to clean up our environment from litter. One of the highlights of this year’s campaign was that it extended its reach beyond the European Union, as actions were registered also in Andorra, Albania, and Switzerland.

During the campaign, thousands of initiatives led by public entities, NGOs, schools, private companies, associations, and individuals contributed to collecting at least 2,000 tonnes of waste. This impressive result was reached by 23 European countries working together. All initiatives were supported by the national and regional coordinators, who provided assistance to volunteers as well as disseminated various communication materials.

Lasting for four months, the peak period of the campaign was reached in the beginning of May. Following the celebration of Europe Day on 9 May, the highest number of actions were recorded during the second weekend of the month.

To bring all the actions together, all coordinators, action developers, and participants are invited to share the pictures of their LCUE 2018 actions and participate in the Facebook photo contest organised by the Let’s Clean Up Europe Secretariat.

For more detailed data about the campaign, read the final Press Release.

Register for the 10th EWWR Webin@r on 7 September!

The 10th EWWR training session will be held on 7 September 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30 (CET).

This training session will focus on some of the winning awareness-raising actions of the 9th European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) Awards. By joining this new webinar, you will learn in detail about the best practices for waste prevention, reuse and recycling implemented during the EWWR 2017 from different categories of Action Developers. The presentations will give you some insights into the participants’ involvement and show how each action can be successfully implemented.

Have a look at the programme and don’t forget to register here.

Join this webinar to get inspired and learn about the best pracices of the EWWR 2017!

Don’t hesiate to check our previous training sessions on this page.

EWWR Webinar 10
EWWR Webinar 10

The ‪#‎LCUE2018 photo contest has started!‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

The Let’s Clean Up Europe campaign (LCUE) has launched a photo contest to reward the best pictures taken during the LCUE 2018! Participants have until 31 July 2018 to submit a picture to the LCUE Secretariat via Facebook messenger. All submissions will be made public on 1 August 2018 in order to gather votes through Facebook “Likes” until 31 August 2018. The picture that receives the most likes will be the winning one!

Over the
spring season, hundreds of thousands of participants have joined hands in Europe and beyond to organize clean-up actions during the LCUE 2018 campaign. Throughout the campaign, hundreds of inspirational, highly-motivating photos of clean-up activities from various countries have already been widely shared on social media, embodying relentless engagement against littering and raising public awareness on waste prevention. The photo contest thus aims to further strengthen the powerful mean that is photography in conveying environmental messages as well as inspire people to keep our environment clear of litter, and draw public attention to initiatives that preserve it.

In a nutshell, the rules are:

  • Between 1 and 30 July 2018, participants can send one photo of their action to the Facebook page of Let’s Clean Up Europe (via Messenger), including the following information: name of action, name of action developer, place of implementation;
  • On 1 August 2018, all submissions will be published in the album “#LCUE Photo Contest”;
  • From 1 August 2018 until 31 August 2018 votes (Facebook “Like”) will be collected.

The picture with the most positive reactions will win!

The winner of the LCUE 2018 photo contest will be awarded with limited edition gadgets as well as invited for an interview.

We look forward to seeing all your inspiring pictures!

Important thing to remember before submitting your photos:

  • Make sure that you have rights to the pictures (you are the author of it or you have the agreement of the author);
  • By submitting your photo, you agree that your photo can be shared on Let’s Clean Up Europe and the European Week for Waste Reduction social media channels, and used in the EWWR’s communication materials.
LCUE_photo_contest_2018

The EWWR rewards the best actions from 2017

The EWWR Awards Ceremony took place on 22 May 2018, during the EU Green Week, at the European Committee of the Regions in Brussels, where our honoured Jury revealed the names of the most outstanding awareness-raising actions implemented during the EWWR 2017.

The Commissioner for Environment, Karmenu Vella, Michel Lebrun (Head of the Belgian Delegation, Committee of the Regions) and Josep Maria Tost i Borràs (ACR+ President) opened the Ceremony and welcomed the participants to this great EWWR celebration.

Six winners were awarded, one in each of the categories of Action Developers, as well as a European Special Prize for the action showing the best European spirit. They all happily came on stage to accept their well-deserved awards.

The winners of the EWWR Awards 2017 are:

  • Public Administration and organisation: the winner is La LouvièR³: zero waste objective, implemented by the City of La Louvière (Wallonia, Belgium)
  • Association/NGO: Jo Sóc COCO Campaign, implemented by REZERO (Catalonia, Spain)
  • Business/Industry: Unpacked – directly into the pot!, implemented by Hertel Verwaltungs GmbH (Germany)
  • Education Establishment: Designing orthopaedic and medical devices reusing materials, implemented by IES Comte de Rius (Catalonia, Spain)
  • Citizen(s): Anti-Black Friday Gorilla Campaign, implemented by Conscious Cup Campaign (Ireland)
  • European Special Prize: Coffee-to-go-nochemol, implement by the Eurodistrikt Strasbourg-Ortenau (France and Germany)

Congratulations to them all!

For more information about the winners and finalists, please have a look at our comprehensive Press File. The photos of the event are also available here.

Follow @ewwr.eu & @2EWWR to get the latest information about the project, events as well as motivating ideas for taking steps towards waste reduction, products reuse, and materials recycling!

© European Union / Giedre Daugelaite
© European Union / Giedre Daugelaite

#EWWRAwards winner || European Special Pize • Eurodistrikt Strasbourg-Ortenau

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners were revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. Right after the ceromy, we caught up with the winner of the European Special Prize to learn more about their initiative, motivation to organise the cross-border action and commitment for waste reduction.

1 • What is the action “Coffee-to-go-nochemol” about?

It is a project on reusable coffee cups in the Eurodistrikt Strasbourg-Ortenau. First and foremost it is a communication campaign aiming to raise awareness among clients and vendors on the negative environmental effects caused by single-use coffee-to-go cups. The project consisted of two key elements: the communication kit and the development of hygiene recommendations.

In terms of communications, the project team developed a common slogan: “coffee-to-go-nochemol”. “Nochemol” means “again” in the Alsatian and Alemannic dialects. After a close consideration of environmental, health and social aspects they also created a “Eurodistrict cup”. It was distributed to interested vendors and citizens.

In addition to this, the project team carried out a survey among vendors of “coffee-to-go” in order to find out if they would accept reusable cups for their coffee. The survey revealed that the main barrier was doubts concerning hygiene. Thereby, the hygiene recommendations were written in close cooperation with safety offices in both countries, France and Germany, and with representatives of the bakers’ guilds. This was an essential achievement for comforting vendors of coffee-to-go to accept reusable coffee cups.

The project was developed by the Eurodistrict together with all environmental managers of its member cities and representatives of the bakers’ guilds. The aim was to find a way on how to reduce waste caused by one-way coffee cups on the common German-French territory. The interest in the project was very high and during the project, more partners joined.

2 • Why is waste reduction important for your area?

The trend of taking coffee-to-go instead of sitting down and enjoying it in the cafe is steadily increasing. In Germany alone, 2.8 billions of coffee-to-go-cups are sold yearly. This represents 40,000 tons of waste for an item which is used for approximately 15 minutes.

3 • What encouraged you to organise a cross-border action?

The problem of waste concerns everyone. Despite the fact that in France the trend is not as advanced as in Germany, the bakers’ guilds wanted to take pre-emptive measures before “bad habits” are formed and anchored everywhere. Moreover, the approach allowed us to enforce the common identity of the Eurodistrict by using a slogan for the campaign in the regional dialect.

4 • How did you come across this idea?

We were inspired by other actions, such as those developed in Munich and in Freiburg, and chose the best elements from other approaches.

5 • Where can we find you?

Website: www.eurodistrict.eu

Social media: Facebook | Twitter

#EWWRAwards finalists || Citizen • Daniela Malanchini

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is “An Entire Island for Nature” about?

“An Entire Island of Nature” is a project that united 61 different institutions on the island of Santa Maria in the Azores. Both public and private entities participated in the initiative to make the island greener. During the project, 363 shopping bags were made by reusing animal feedbags. The reused bags were put on display during an exhibition at the Municipality of Vila do Porto. At the end of the exhibition, the bags were offered for sale to the public for a symbolic 1 euro price. The collected money was then donated to the municipal kennel. The project was developed little-by-little. I started talking with friends about this project. I met them one by one, in their offices, in their shops, in their houses and I was there with my 4-5 samples. They were not very well done, but I was so happy thinking that we could do something for the environment. Every time after I finished explaining my project, I could see the same reaction on their face: ‘‘Yes, I want to join this project’‘. Later when I went back collect the bags, I could see that everyone who contributed had become even more enthusiastic. Everyone wanted to tell me how they made their bags: with their children, with their grandparents, with their colleagues, with all their friends. Every single bag has a story and a part of a person’s heart. This is what makes this action special: how 61 different institutions have been able to work together. This project is mine but the result is not due to me. It was my little island Santa Maria - 97 square km and 6000 habitats - that have done the entire work.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

I am Italian and I grew up in a family where Mother Nature has always been present in every single moment of each day. My father once showed me the net of the spider, explaining: ‘’Daniela, I am an engineer but I am not able to make this. This small insect is better than me.’’ Starting from when I was 15 years old, I began living in Kenya for 3 months out of the year. I remember that a tourist was taking a picture of a tree with a lot of black birds, only to realise later that those black birds were in fact plastic bags! I am also seeing a lot of plastics abandoned in nature all around us. As such, I have started to clean up the surrounding. At the beginning the locals were watching me. But little by little they started joining me and began cleaning up as well. It was time for us all to do something together.

The photographs of the pollution of the river Citarum and documentaries on the topic helped us to realize the serious problem in which the planet is today. Therefore, we decided that it would be a good idea to see our students committed, aware and working with a shared purpose: the protection of the environment, since “everything is possible if we believe in it”. We were sure that all of these actions would not only have an impact on the students but also motivate the teachers, families, towns and villages around the school. Our aim is that all the activities result in a lasting behavioural change.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

For all of us living in the Santa Maria waste reduction is important because we live on an island and we need our land for us, for our animals, for our plants, for our food but not for our rubbish. We are ‘‘an entire island for nature’‘.

#EWWRAwards finalists || Public Administration • City of La Louvière

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is “La LouvièR³: zero waste objective” about

For several years, the City of La Louvière has been committed to implementing a responsible policy of waste reduction by investing in actions and awareness campaigns in terms of prevention, re-use and recycling. Within the context of the EWWR 2017, the Environment Department proposed to provide information, advice and tips, thereby enabling citizens to produce less waste when shopping without diminishing their “comfort”. To do this, the Environment Department organised the week around the R³ approach: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. The activities focused on four aspects:

  • Primary Schools: “A Zero Waste Week at School!”;
  • Citizens: Zero Waste conference, Zero waste cooking lessons, natural cleaning products workshop, natural “winter” cosmetics products workshop, awareness stands;
  • Communication: A Waste Reduction Guide, book presentation about Zero Waste cooking, guide to reducing waste in 2017 with experiences from families that have tried the zero waste experience;
  • Local shops: Launch of a Zero Waste label.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

La Louvière has been active in the field of waste prevention since 2000. This makes it a long-term project, targeting the general public as well as pupils, public administrators and businesses. Within this framework, the city’s environment service regularly communicates the importance of waste reduction, organises various awareness raising campaigns, trainings as well as projects. The idea to organise the “La LouvièR³: zero waste objective!” was conceived step-by-step by organising those different activities. La Louvière wanted to promote waste reduction by accentuating waste prevention during this single week.

The photographs of the pollution of the river Citarum and documentaries on the topic helped us to realize the serious problem in which the planet is today. Therefore, we decided that it would be a good idea to see our students committed, aware and working with a shared purpose: the protection of the environment, since “everything is possible if we believe in it”. We were sure that all of these actions would not only have an impact on the students but also motivate the teachers, families, towns and villages around the school. Our aim is that all the activities result in a lasting behavioural change.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

Waste reduction is important for the city of La Louvière because it reduces the impact of waste on the environment by encouraging citizens to change their habits in a sustainable way. With waste prevention we can avoid the environmental impacts due to waste treatment but also extends the product life-cycle. It also contributes to reducing health impacts associated with the production and management of certain waste materials. Lastly, it allows citizens to have a better quality of life.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: www.lalouviere.be

Social media: Facebook | Twitter

#EWWRAwards finalists || Educational Establishment • IES Valle De Aller

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is your action “Sustainable development begins with education” about?

It is a series of simple, practical and useful activities for our daily life that can be carried out in order to make pupils and their families aware of the huge amount of waste they produce. The aim is to encourage them to act by the “3Rs” approach: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. As part of our action, we developed a campaign promoting reduction and recycling. Thus, we have created various materials about the environmental benefits of paper, plastic, glass and WEE recycling. We have also initiated a poster contest to raise awareness about waste as well as developed a solidarity act in order to give new life to used items such as clothes, toys and others. Lastly, we addressed the issue of sustainability at our canteen by cooking with seasonal local products, banning packaged juices and products prepared with palm oil.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

We usually do these activities throughout the year in our Health Project, so we came up with the idea to bring them all together in a week in order to participate in the EWWR. We know that Education is the basis for development, and this is what we try to demonstrate as we are celebrating our 50th anniversary.

The photographs of the pollution of the river Citarum and documentaries on the topic helped us to realize the serious problem in which the planet is today. Therefore, we decided that it would be a good idea to see our students committed, aware and working with a shared purpose: the protection of the environment, since “everything is possible if we believe in it”. We were sure that all of these actions would not only have an impact on the students but also motivate the teachers, families, towns and villages around the school. Our aim is that all the activities result in a lasting behavioural change.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

The dumping site of Asturias is almost filled. We know that in one or two years we will have no place to deposit the enormous amount of waste we generate every day. Therefore, it is necessary that our students, their families and the faculty are aware of the importance and the need for the reduction, reuse and recycling.

In addition, our region is known throughout the world as the “Natural paradise”, and we must thank for it to the natural water surrounding it. To preserve this fundamental resource, it is necessary to raise awareness on waste reduction in order to avoid water contamination. With this action, we are helping our planet and teaching people that a throw-away culture is wasteful and destroying our planet. Especially since the problem of waste is an international one, due to waste moving around to other places in the world.

Besides protecting the environment, we are also helping people: WEE recycling avoids wars and slavery, our plastic bottle caps collection campaign helps children with rare diseases and our clothes, toys and junks collection campaign helps families of limited financial resources.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/iesmoredadealler/

Social media: Facebook | Twitter

#EWWRAwards finalists || NGO • Agara foundation

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is your action “Giving laptops a second chance!” about?

“Giving laptops a second chance!” is part of our PoléPolé campaign, which is Agara’s current project, initiated in the beginning of 2016. It aims to bring together numerous projects which are similar in nature but whose outcomes are intended for different locations. All projects are focused on providing laptops to schools, rehabilitation centres or any other similar entities which are already up and running and whose plan is to continue its activities. Almost all of the laptops for Agara’s PoléPolé campaign are donated by individuals and companies. Agara collects these laptops for repair and reuse and thus prevents them from being tossed by the companies and individuals. The repaired items are then distributed to the PoléPolé projects. The laptops that Agara does not manage to repair are dismantled and used for parts to fix other laptops. Up until now, over 60 laptops have been collected, of which 40 have been repaired and donated to one of the selected projects, which has both a local and international scope. During the EWWR 2017, Agara carried out a one-week awareness raising campaign to promote the topic of “Reuse and Repair – Give it a new life”. During this campaign, it also collaborated with Vodafone Malta to collect electronics for repair from the company.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

Agara envisions a global community in which every individual is an equal partner. It seeks to invest in relationships within communities and, above all, empower individuals by coming together to cultivate a sense of growth, self-reliance, collaboration and continuity through supporting and establishing projects across the world. Agara is driven by the belief that human rights are inalienable and fundamental to each and every individual. As such, it aims to promote them through awareness-raising projects. The beauty of Agara’s mission statement means that in fact Agara runs a 365-day campaign through the PoléPolé project. Through this project, everyone is truly encouraged to embrace the 3Rs principle – Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

Other than sustaining our projects, aims and saving money, we are making better use of what would otherwise be hazardous waste. Rather than sending all the unwanted waste to our landfills, which is an eyesore and detrimental to our health, Agara puts this electronic waste back into practice through its PoléPolé projects. Concurrently, this reduces the amount of packaging from new devices going to waste.

4 • Where can we find you?

Social media: Facebook

#EWWRAwards finalists || Citizens • Conscious Cup Campaign

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is the “Anti Black Friday Gorilla Campaign” about?

The Conscious Cup Campaign held an anti-Black Friday ‘guerrilla’ public awareness event in Dublin’s Wolfe Tone Square. We chose one of the busiest shopping days of the year to create greater awareness of the significant negative impact from the manufacture, distribution and disposal of single use items such as a coffee cup and the effect it has on our environment and climate change. Shoppers on Jervis and Henry streets who completed an informative questionnaire and signed a “Pledge to Carry Your Cup” were awarded their very own reusable cup. Over 450 cups were issued to those who took the pledge on the day. We also had a team of promotional staff from Dublin’s leading radio station Q102 Blue Crew which created great excitement around the event.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

We knew we had to educate people that disposable cups were not currently recyclable and we felt one-to-one contact and two-way communication was the best way to do it. We also knew that this particular day had the heaviest flow of pedestrians in the shopping area and we had a captive audience. Black Friday is an annual festival of consumption for items such as technology, plastic and clothing. Record breaking online sales lead to increased packaging and delivery which also heavily impact on our environment in terms of waste and pollution. We wanted to remind people to be discerning about their purchases and consider the waste involved.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

We have a duty to respect our natural environment and the planet’s living creatures. By reducing and reusing we drastically decrease the negative effects of waste production and disposal. By following this policy we have the chance of a healthier future for our planet and its inhabitants.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: https://consciouscup.ie

Social media: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

#EWWRAwards finalists || NGO • REZERO

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is the “Jo Sóc COCO Campaign” and “Objective #Rezero” web series about?

The “Objective #Rezero” web series, is part of Jo Sóc COCO Campaign focusing on Conscious Consumption, is the first European web documentary on waste reduction that features five families undertaking a challenge: 30-DAYS WITHOUT GENERATING WASTE. It focuses on the daily lives and routines of different types of households We choose to follow different types of ordinary household instead of the environmental activists in order to have a broad representation of the population and make the series easily relatable. The participants recorded their experiences on their own mobile phones themselves. The main aim of the web series was to promote the Zero Waste lifestyle by disseminating practical information and the virtues of this lifestyle in a positive, empathetic and attractive way. We also held a presentation of a series of impact photo depicting the amount of waste one month before and one month after the challenge. This part of the project involved collecting weekly waste produced by each household, classifying it and, at the end of the month, taking it all back to the living room of each house in order to take a visually striking photograph. One of the main achievements of the project is that people, while talking about the issue of waste, no longer talks exclusively about recycling, but they also reflect on how waste can be to avoided in their daily lives in the first place. The discussion thus spins around questions such as the necessity of certain products; importance of making shopping lists, using lunch boxes, reusable bags and reusable hygiene products (such as menstrual cups, cotton menstrual pads and reusable nappies); as well as starting home composting.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

This campaign was born as a strategic campaign. We wanted to approach waste reduction and reuse, not with the discursive, descriptive and/or enticing tone that widely used, but with a more human and comprehensive point of view, with its contradictions, emotions, desire, discouragement, humour, irony and push.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

REZERO is a not-for-profit organisation that has been working for the last decade towards a Zero Waste production and consumption model, in partnership with social and economic agents in Catalonia. It is in our core activities to advocate and contribute to waste reduction.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: www.rezero.cat | www.consumconscient.rezero.cat
Social media: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

#EWWRAwards finalists || Business • Fundación real dreams

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is your action “Digital devices reuse” about?

During the EWWR 2017, the project donalo.org developed by Fundación real dreams in collaboration with eReuse, CTecno and La Nau, established collection points for digital devices in 20 companies, mostly public administration and technology companies in Catalonia. This has led to the collection of 2,339 kilograms of electronics, which was then prepared for reuse and donated to various NGOs. To ensure the traceability of the donated digital items, the eReuse.org tool was used. This allowed us to monitor the geographical places, reuse agents and the final receivers of the recycled objects. It also allowed us to be accountable for our donors and also give them environment and social indicators for their Corporate Social Responsibility. Despite the fact that our action was executed on a small scale, it offers a model that can be replicated in other European locations. The model that has a positive impact on three main aspects: environmental protection; stimulation of local economy (since refurbishment of 40 devices and re-selling them to NGOs at subsidized prizes allows generating jobs; social aspect that addresses the NGOs digital gap.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

The main idea was to fight against the ironic context in which we live nowadays: on the one hand, we have an unequal access to digital devices, and on the other hand, we have a huge issue with electronic waste. Via our platform we receive a lot of requests for computers from NGOs, which we cannot always meet. For this reason, we decided to implement the action of collecting digital devices. The idea was to offer to companies, especially those involved in tech, the possibility to donate their computers with the guarantee that they will be recycled at the end life.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

Between 2005 and 2015 a total of 3,314 million digital devices have been sold worldwide but only a small fraction of these devices and their components have an extended lifespan in Europe by repair, upgrade or reuse. Seeing this global problem, we aim to transform the linear supply chain into loops that retain more value for digital devices. We understand that circularity critically depends on the traceability of devices and cooperation among stakeholders. For this reason, we try to obtain used PCs from underutilized resources that are destined to be wasted. Our work is underlined by a correct use of the 3Rs rule in order to maximize the products life and minimize the generation of waste.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: www.donalo.org | www.fundacionrealdreams.org
Social media (organiser): Facebook | Twitter
Social media (project): Facebook | Twitter

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

#EWWRAwards finalists || Public Administration • Sysav

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is “Resterkocken” about?

Resterkocken (a wordplay on Masterchef in Swedish) is a fun and creative challenge for children and adolescents aged 10-15 years. The competition was about sharing their best leftover food recipes as picture, film or text at www.resterkocken.se. The whole project was simple. It was about showing what to cook from a good deal of the remnants and the food that is getting old. The students’ innovative recipes and dishes of leftovers were shown on the website. For example, bananas that had turned brown were used for baking, vegetables forgotten in the fridge were used as pizza toppings and much more. The competition entries were created both at home and in schools – with entire classes contributing in some entries.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

We wanted to make a campaign to reduce leftovers and engage young people. In particular, young children who just started to learn how to cook and experiment in the kitchen and thus widely can contribute at home to food waste reduction. We decided that the action should be digital, easy to do but also competition. Masterchef is a popular TV program in Sweden and Resterkocken (leftover chef) is a way to flirt with the TV program.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

Sysav is at the heart of the eco-cycle. We contribute to a better environment by receiving waste and recycling as much as possible. We work proactively in raising awareness that every choice we make in our everyday lives affects our environment and climate in some way. But Sysav is aiming higher still – we want to help create the world’s most sustainable region in Sweden. To achieve this we collaborate with our owner municipalities and partners – both nationally and internationally. Sysav wants to help create a sustainable region, for current and future generations alike.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: www.sysav.se

Social media: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

#EWWRAwards finalists || Educational Establishment • IES Comte de Rius

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is the “Giving light to a wheelchair” about?

It is a solidarity project aiming to improve mobility of the elderly who are using wheelchairs in the streets while raising the awareness of students on waste prevention and reuse. To do so we have created blinkers to be fixed on the wheelchair that help to indicate the turning direction and thereby let the elderly circulate more safely using only reused and recycled materials. Our goal is to improve the living standard of the elderly through innovation created by our students. During the project students have designed and 3-D printed a system of blinkers and reversing lights with an autonomous battery of an electrical bicycle.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

Our first idea was to create a project based on solidarity principle in order to help vulnerable people and we immediately thought of the elderly. After brainstorming and analysing their needs we thought about the difficulties they face as far as mobility is concerned. Together with the mobility another idea came to our minds - emotional motivation. The elderly need to feel autonomous and independent as much as possible and this was our underlining motivation – to help them improve their quality of life with multi-sensory accessories. Waste reduction being such an important topic, it was also a great opportunity to teach our students about it. That’s how our idea was born.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

By reducing waste, we can significantly reduce our environmental footprint. Additionally, we can turn waste in to resource material. It is important for us to be aware of it and to know what world we want to live in. If we have this clear in mind, we have no other options.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: www.comtederius.cat

Social media: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

Join the EWWR Awards Ceremony on 22 May in Brussels!

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) is happy to invite you for its annual celebration: the EWWR 2017 Awards Ceremony. The event, hosted by the European Committee of the Regions, will take place at 11am on 22 May in Brussels, in the framework of the EU Green Week. It will be opened by Karmenu Vella, the European Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries. Have a look at the agenda of the event. Registrations are open until 11 May 2018.

On this date, the EWWR will celebrate the most oustanding actions on waste reduction organised during the the EWWR 2017. This is a wonderful opportunity to put the spotlight on some of the EWWR most innovative, effective and long-lasting actions raising awareness on waste prevention.

REGISTER HERE AND JOIN US IN BRUSSELS!

Join us for the 2017 EWWR Awards Ceremony and discover the winning actions in each category: Public Administration, Association/NGO, Business, Educational Establishment, and Citizen. This year, a European Special Prize will also be attributed to the action that best contributed to the European spirit. Check out all the finalists in our Press Release and read their interviews in our News section.

For more information about the Awards process and the EWWR jury, have a look at our page: www.ewwr.eu/en/ideas/awards.

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook @ewwr.eu & Twitter @2EWWR to get the latest updates!

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#EWWRAwards finalists || Citizen • Marlena Sdrenka

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is the “Waste Reduction in Everyday Life: A Step-by-Step Guide” about?

As part of the EWWR 2017 I gave a talk at one of Hamburg’s bulk stores and did a free give-away for my one-on-one consultations. They are structured as a clear step-by-step guide on how to incorporate more sustainable habits into your daily life. My goals with these talks are to: inform people and raise awareness; support changes in their everyday lives; motivate and inspire to change for a more sustainable lifestyle; foster exchange by offering an online community for people to connect, exchange experiences and motivate each other.

I aim to guide people into behavioural changes in their everyday life to achieve a societal change in how we view and handle waste. My goal is for people to realise the importance of a circular economy.

In my talks I commence by covering some data and why we are even talking about waste reduction, what the motivation and issues are and why it is a relevant topic for us. Then, the step-by-step guide is split up into a section on how to reduce waste in the kitchen and a second one in the bathroom. These cover the entire spectrum of aspects that arise in the kitchen, from grocery shopping, food storage, cleaning products, food waste, to kitchen utensils. The same applies to the bathroom which covers things such as DIY cosmetics, hygiene, cleaning products etc. As a general rule of thumb I advice people to switch from single-use disposable products to reusable ones, carefully consider materials which products are made from, as well as the production and transportation of a product.

I then conclude by empowering my audience to understand that every little change helps and does make a difference no matter what others tell them and present some figures. I encourage them to be inspired and to not view a more sustainable life as a restriction or sacrifice but instead as enriching and fulfilling.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

My degree in International Relations provided me with a strong awareness for the interconnectedness of everything. So my motivation for the topic of waste reduction and sustainability in general was a given. The format itself stems from the natural human desire for guidelines, and in this case, guidelines on how to lead a more sustainable life. My observation was that people in general do want to make a difference, they just simply do not know how to. So I identified my role as simply breaking this broad topic down into an easy-to-follow guide. Moreover, I believe there is too much negativity and finger-pointing surrounding the topic of sustainability. I aspire to turn the public discourse into a highly positive, encouraging, motivating and inspiring one in order to reach the broadest audience possible and get everyone on board. That is why I strive to inspire people with regards to sustainability.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

Common sense simply tells me that running everything from production, to work force and society in general in a linear manner is not sustainable. We are blessed to live on a planet in a system which has the capability to regenerate itself - if we only let it. Therefore, I believe it is mandatory to realise the importance of circular systems for our own survival on this planet. Anyone who is not interested in saving the environment should at least be interested in saving themselves and saving the environment equals saving ourselves. We are the environment and the environment is us, there simply is no planet B for us.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: www.zerowasteplantpower.com

Social media: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

#EWWRAwards finalists || Business • OPEL España

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is your action “Environmental awareness for workers and contractors” about?

Achieving excellence in environmental and energy management requires the involvement of the entire organization. This is why Opel España and the Zaragoza plant participate and support different initiatives in order to develop environmental awareness among its employees, contractors, suppliers and students.

We have been involved in the European Week for Waste Reduction since 2013 and during the last EWWR in 2017 we organized a full week of different environmental awareness activities on various waste prevention themes, such as:

  • Exhibitions about cardboard and plastic recycling
  • Paper saving publicity
  • Product exchange SharePoint (empowered by a web application)
  • Zero waste meals in 2 cantinas of the factory
  • Clothes and plastic caps collection point
  • Videos about food waste reduction in Zaragoza
  • Facebook photo contest

2 • How did you come across this idea?

Opel España and Zaragoza plant are making great efforts to engage our stakeholders, including our employees, to promote the sustainability agenda. To assure landfill-free status and reduce waste we have developed a strategy that comprises different stages and one of them is employees’ empowerment. Our employees are key. For that reason, we decided to celebrate the EWWR and involve employees, contractors, suppliers, grantees and students of the plant in the campaign.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

Waste reduction for us means safeguarding our land and building a better future for the community in which we operate. It is one of the commitments of the Opel/Vauxhall Environment and Energy Policy. For this reason we have defined waste reduction targets. Employee training and awareness raising campaigns together with a strong network of recycling partners and suppliers helped the facility to achieve its waste reduction and recycling goals.

Additionally Opel España and Zaragoza plant has implemented outstanding initiatives that support strongly circular economy through waste management and industrial symbiosis. In 2014, our company achieved landfill-free status, that is: recycling, reusing or transforming the waste generated in daily operations into energy instead of sending it to landfill for disposal.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: www.opel.es

Social media: @Opel_Spain | @OpelSpain

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

#EWWRAwards finalists || Education • Carluke Primary School & Chefs@Schools

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is “Soup-a-thon” about?”

During the EWWR 2017, we launched our “soup-a-thon” programme with a theme of food waste prevention. We created 4 soup recipes for using up vegetables that are often forgotten in the fridge and ran four workshops in different schools teaching basic cooking skills as well as the impacts of food waste in Scotland. We showed the children how simple things like using our freezers better can be effective at preventing waste – saving money and saving the planet! We twinned our action with Sant Josep School in Navàs and had the pupils try out saying different words in Catalan – “no food waste” was a bit too much for the Scottish pupils but they loved trying out “soup” and “freeze”. The EWWR was just the beginning; since November we’ve run workshops in over 8 schools reaching 456 children. The programme will continue throughout the Scottish Year of Young People 2018 in a bid to raise awareness of food waste and to ensure that children gain lifelong skills from our project.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

For a long time, we had been thinking about how soup is often overlooked in Scotland, but it is such a simple nutritious and tasty way of reducing food waste – easily adaptable and a great way to teach core cookery skills. It seemed to us like the perfect vehicle for the core messages of the European Week for Waste Reduction such as encouraging individual action and raising awareness.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

Working closely with professionals in the food industry and young people across Scotland, we know the impact that food waste, in particular, can have and the importance of reducing it from both a business and environmental perspective. Reducing waste, in general, is something we integrate into every element of the Chefs@School Programme. Knowing that and understanding of this issue is a critical importance to our future generations.

4 • Where can we find you?

Recipes: https://scotland.lovefoodhatewaste.com

Website: www.chefsatschool.org

Social media: @ChefsAtSchool | @ChefsatSchool

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

#EWWRAwards finalists || NGO • Bluepingu e.V.

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is “Be a Frängaroo - always bring your bag with you!” about?”

Our aim is to encourage people to reuse their bags and coffee-to-go mugs on a daily basis in bakeries and coffee shops. To make this simple and fun we created bags and mugs with our Franconian marsupial the “Fränguru” (Frängaroo) and distributed them for free in a number of shops and bakeries. The success of our little project has already resulted in a number of requests to repeat the campaign also in other regions. Thus, we are working on our next actions!

2 • How did you come across this idea?

In early 2017 we launched our “Zero Waste Group” in Nuremberg and were deliberating about our first project. Suddenly we realized that even though many people use tote bags, they use additional disposable bags for bread and baked goods. So we wanted to find a fashionable and smart way to change this. From this moment on, the idea evolved quickly: We found a local producer of eco-fair bags. Together with the artist Gymmick we developed the design of the Franconian marsupial, our “Frängaroo”. Then the bags were printed with plant-based, food safe water colours and we constructed the stand-up display with a laser cutter on our own. As far as the production of our mugs is concerned, the process and motivation were similar.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

We want to show that taking action and having fun do not contradict each other. All resources are precious and thus should be used as long as possible. We are affected by the impact of tons of toxic plastic that harm the ecosystem, wildlife and ourselves. We have to do something against this massive pollution, and we have to do it now! We believe in the idea of a zero-waste-society. Everything produced should become earth again or should be completely recycled at the end of its lifecycle.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: www.bluepingu.de

Social media: @BluepinguFranken | @ZeroWasteNUE | @Bluepingu | @bluepingu_nuernberg

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

#EWWRAwards finalists || Business • Hertel Hähnchen

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is the “Unpacked - directly into the pot” campaign about?

Our brand Hertel Hähnchen sells rotisserie chicken and other rotisserie meats, salads and baked goods. Under the name “Unpacked - directly into the pot” we asked our customers to bring their pots to the Food Trucks with flyers, a note on our homepage and a specially made video. The participation in the campaign was particularly well received by our customers during the European Week for Waste Reduction. But even after the event, we were able to convince some chicken buyers to take the grilled goods with them in the pot and support our ongoing campaign. The proceeds from the packaging material that we were able to save were donated to the NABU project “Oceans without plastic” in December 2017.

We hope that the campaign will continue to be very well received and we intend to focus increasingly on waste avoidance and the search for alternative packaging options for our products over the next few years.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

Our customers all fancy a good, traditional dish with few ingredients that he or she can eat right at home. Accordingly, our packaging must keep the food warm for at least 30 minutes and the gravy should remain with the product and not leak out. That is why we have been using composite materials for packaging for decades: paper on the outside, film on the inside. While it meets all requirements and is space-saving, it is not ecologically optimal.

We’ve tried other solutions: Bags made of corn starch, for example: Sounds great, but the ecological balance of these bags is worse than that of our existing packaging. Our favorite: bagasse packaging - a waste product from sugar production. It keeps warm but not tight and it is very voluminous: We don’t have enough space in our food trucks for the many boxes that would be necessary!
We started looking for reusable containers: there are lunch boxes made of stainless steel with heat accumulators. But they only come in round shape! And a ½ Chicken is oval. We were wondering if anyone would be willing to buy expensive custom-made product. Honestly, we wouldn’t be! Our cupboards are full! Full of pots, pots in all imaginable sizes! The solution was so simple from the beginning and therefore so right that we knew that we could inspire many customers with it. Just bring one of your own pots to the stand!

3 • Why is waste reduction important for your organisation?

As a company, we are happy as we have to buy less packaging and save money. Customers are happy as all they have to throw away after dining are bones. The municipalities that permit sales locations to us are also delighted because many of them have taken up the cause of waste reduction. And as mothers and fathers, we are delighted that we are making a small contribution to our children’s inheritance of an intact environment.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: https://hertel-haehnchen.de

Social media: www.facebook.com/hertelhaehnchen

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

#EWWRAwards finalists || Public Administration • North London Waste Authority

The EWWR Awards finalists have been announced! In each category the Jury has selected their top 3 finalists. The winners will be revealed on 22 May in Brussels during the EWWR Awards Ceremony. To find out more about the finalists, their initiative and commitment for waste reduction, we have caught up with them for a short interview.

1 • What is the “London Upcycling Show” about?

The London Upcycling Show is an event that aims to give people the opportunity to learn, celebrate and experience the best of upcycling and giving furniture a second life, to showcase and encourage upcycling, repair and reuse of unwanted household items, to help to preserve valuable resources and to divert reusable items from disposal.

2 • How did you come across this idea?

The concept and idea behind the London Upcycling Show was created and developed by NLWA officers. An upcycling competition and a free of charge exhibition is the first of this kind to take place in the UK. Following a pilot version, officers enhanced and scaled up the concept, put learnings into practice and in consultation with project partners, participants and attendees developed a new improved version for NLWA’s participation in the European Week for Waste Reduction in 2017.

3 • Why is waste reduction important for you/your organisation?

Waste prevention is a priority for European, national and regional government. It is at the top of the waste hierarchy, as the preferred activity to deliver sustainable outcomes.

4 • Where can we find you?

Website: http://nlwa.gov.uk | www.wiseuptowaste.org.uk

Social media: https://twitter.com/wiseuptowaste

Register for the Awards Ceremony here and join us in Brussels to discover who the winners will be!

Register for the EWWR Awards Ceremony on 22 May in Brussels!

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) is happy to invite you for its annual celebration: the EWWR 2017 Awards Ceremony. The event, hosted by the European Committee of the Regions, will take place at 11am on 22 May in Brussels, in the framework of the EU Green Week. It will be opened by Karmenu Vella, the European Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries. Have a look at the agenda of the event.

On this date, the EWWR will celebrate the most oustanding actions on waste reduction organised during the the EWWR 2017. This is a wonderful opportunity to put the spotlight on some of the EWWR most innovative, effective and long-lasting actions raising awareness on waste prevention.

REGISTER HERE AND JOIN US IN BRUSSELS!

Join us for the 2017 EWWR Awards Ceremony and discover the winning actions in each category: Public Administration, Association/NGO, Business, Educational Establishment, and Citizen. This year, a European Special Prize will also be attributed to the action that best contributed to the European spirit. Check out all the finalists in our Press Release.

For more information about the Awards process and the EWWR jury, have a look at our page: www.ewwr.eu/en/ideas/awards.

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook @ewwr.eu & Twitter @2EWWR to get the latest updates!

Save the date!
Register Now!

The Finalists for the #EWWR2017 Awards have been selected!

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) is excited to announce the names of the EWWR Awards finalists, selected from the over 13,000 inspiring actions implemented during the EWWR 2017.

On 26 March 2018, the EWWR Awards Jury gathered in Brussels to select three finalists for each category of the EWWR Awards, out of the 82 actions submitted by EWWR Coordinators. All the winners, as well as the action that will receive the European Special Prize, will be revealed during the EWWR Awards Ceremony hosted in Brussels, Belgium on 22 May 2018. The event is part of the EU Green Week taking place from 21 to 25 May 2018.

In the meantime, read our Press Release issued today and find out about all the finalists of the EWWR Awards, and the names of our honourable Jury members.

Join us on 22 May in Brussels to discover the names of the winners!

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to get the latest information.

Save-the-date for the EWWR Awards Ceremony on 22 May!

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) is preparing its annual celebration: the EWWR 2017 Awards Ceremony. The event, hosted by the European Committee of the Regions, will take place at 11am on 22 May in Brussels, in the framework of the EU Green Week.

On this date, the EWWR will celebrate the most oustanding actions on waste reduction organised during the the EWWR 2017. This is a wonderful opportunity to put the spotlight on some of the EWWR most innovative, effective and long-lasting actions raising awareness on waste prevention.

Registrations are open until 11 May 2018.

Join us for the 2017 EWWR Awards Ceremony and discover the winning actions in each category: Public Administration, Association/NGO, Business, Educational Establishment, and Citizen. This year, a European Special Prize will also be attributed to the action that best contributed to the European spirit. To get a glimpse of the previous edition’s winners, read last year’s press file here.

For more information about the Awards process and the EWWR jury, have a look at our page: www.ewwr.eu/en/ideas/awards.

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook @ewwr.eu & Twitter @2EWWR to get the latest updates!

Save the date!
Save the date!

Join the Let’s Clean Up Europe! Campaign and register your action now!

Registrations for the Let’s Clean Up Europe! (LCUE) campaign have started! The initiative is back for a new spring edition full of clean-up actions accross Europe.

Your clean-up activities can take place from 1 March until 30 June 2018. This gives you plenty of options to find the ideal day based on your climatic and geographic conditions.

How can you participate? It is very easy, simply fill in this registration form before 4 May. If you have any questions, the LCUE Coordinators are here to answer them and guide you through the steps for a successful a clean-up event.

When is the best time to organise my action? The weekend of 11-13 May is the perfect date! Each year, the Let’s Clean Up Europe campaign chooses a central weekend to create a strong momentum and raise awareness about the critical issues related to litter and unsustainable consumption patterns. We warmly encourage you to pick this weekend for your action and join your voice to thousands of others.

Don’t forget to fill in the registration form!

Find out more about Let’s Clean Up Europe on our page and get the latest updates by following @LCUEofficial & @LetsCleanUpEU.

The Let’s Clean Up Europe campaign is organised in the framework of the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) led by the EWWR Steering Committee.

The EWWR 2017 is breaking records with 13,410 actions!

The 9th edition of the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) has proven to be triumphant once again! After months of preparations with the great work of 40 EWWR Coordinatorsand numerous Action Developers, a record number of 13,410 actions have been implemented in 30 different countries.

From 18 to 26 November 2017, EWWR actions across European and beyond raised awareness about the critical issues related to waste. Inspiring examples ranged from upcycling festivals to original information campaigns on Reuse&Repair, swapping events and setting up of Give-away boxes. Find out more about these fantastic actions in the EWWR Database!

You can also have a look at our EWWR Press Release! For more details please refer to the EWWR Press Kit which includes the key numbers and other specific information, as well as a map of EWWR Actions and the description of some interesting actions.

Check out #EWWR2017 & #GiveItANewLifeto see what happened during the EWWR on Facebook,Twitter;and Instagram!

Registrations for the European Week for Waste Reduction are now open!

Are you ready to take part in the EWWR 2017? You are welcome to register your action, become an Action Developer, and take part in the biggest awareness-raising campaign on waste reduction in Europe.

If you are a public authority, association, NGO, business, educational establishment or an individual that believes 477 kg of waste produced per person yearly in the EU are 477 kg too many, organise an action focusing on the “3Rs”: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle, and contribute to the change. All kinds of actions are welcome, conferences, contests, exhibitions or information campaigns, as long as it aims at raising awareness on waste reduction.

Do you have some fresh ideas on what could make a positive change? Then follow this link www.ewwr.eu/register, complete your registration, get access to all the EWWR Communication tools and start planning your action. The EWWR will take place between 18th and 26th November 2017.

“Give it a new life” is in the spotlight this year, which encourages reusing and repairing rather than throwing away. Have a look at our page to see new content specifically created for this theme.

For further information visit the EWWR website. Should you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact the EWWR Secretariat.

We are curious to hear about all your initiatives planned for November!

What has the EWWR been up to for the past 4 years?

EWWR Key Results (2013-2017)
EWWR Key Results (2013-2017)

On 30 June 2017, the LIFE+ programme financing of the EWWR has ended. Fortunately, the EWWR is continuing its mission to reduce waste thanks to its new European Steering Committee!

The 9th edition will take place as usual during the last week of November, from 18 to 26 November 2017.

With this fresh start, when would be a better time to reflect on the last 4 years under the LIFE programme? We have compiled a short summary of our activities, results and general information about waste reduction in a Layman’s report. Check it out to discover some pictures, data and infographics about the EWWR!

Here is the EWWR Layman’s report, also available in Catalan, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Italian and Spanish.

It is now your turn to take action!

The EWWR as one of the most outstanding LIFE projects from the past 25 years!

On 30 May 2017 the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) received an honourable acknowledgement, more exactly the recognition as one of the most outstanding LIFE projects from the past 25 years of the LIFE funding programme.

This came in the context of celebrating 25 successful years of the European Commission’s funding programme, which were marked by the ceremony of the Life Green Awards. The EWWR was a runner-up in the category of Environment along with 4 other projects. 10 more project were nominated in the category of Climate, and Nature, putting the spotlight on the most representative LIFE projects of the past years.

Although the LIFE funding for the EWWR is coming to an end this June, the campaign is continuing with more and better actions to raise awareness about waste prevention, all between 18 and 26 November 2017!

Stay tuned for more news by following the EWWR on Twitter @2EWWR and Facebook @ewwr.eu

The runner-up certificate for the EWWR!
The runner-up certificate for the EWWR!


Register for the 9th EWWR Webin@r on 15 June 2017!

The 9th training session will be held on 15 June 2017 from 10:30 to 12:00 (CET).

The webinar will focus on some of the winning awareness-raising actions of the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) 2016 Awards. By joining this training you can learn in detail about the best practices for waste prevention, reuse and recycling implemented during the last edition of the EWWR. You will find out about how to organise and implement a successful action regardless if you are an individual citizen, a business or a municipality. We have the best practices in every category of Action Developer!

Have a closer look at the event and see the programme here.

Join this free webinar to get inspired and learn about the best practices of the EWWR 2016!

Click here to register!

Don’t hesitate to check our previous trainings sessions on this page.

Register now!
Register now!

The EWWR International Conference and Awards Ceremony - Giving recognition to "3Rs" practices!

Last Thursday, 18 May 2017, was a very special day for the European Week for Waste Reduction! It marked the peak of what has been an amazing year for the awareness raising campaign. Out of 12, 255 actions that were registered for the EWWR from 19 to 27 November 2016, 86 actions were submitted by the EWWR Coordinators to compete for the EWWR Awards.

Following a challenging selection process, the Jury finally elected 3 actions per category of Action Developers as finalists to run for the EWWR Awards. Find out more about the selection process here.

The winners were announced at the EWWR Awards Ceremony in Barcelona and they are:

  • In the Administration/Public Authority category the winner is Travel with Recycling, implemented by Ayuntamiento de Utebo, Spain.
  • In the Association/NGOs category the winner is Zero Waste EWWR in Végegyháza, implemented by Barangoló Közhasznú Egyesület (Barangoló Public Association), Hungary.
  • In the Business/Industry category the winner is Jo em comprometo! (I commit myself!), implemented by Caprabo, Spain.
  • In the Educational Establishment category the winner is Un jardín para todos (A garden for everyone), implemented by Ikastola Iparragirre, Spain.
  • In Citizen(s) category the winner is The experiment “Yellow bag”, implemented by Evelyn Spillmann, in Hildesheim, Germany.
  • In the Other category the winner is Systemic Food Design, implemented by University of Gastronomic Sciences, Italy.

Warm congratulations to them! To get more information about the winners and finalists see the Press File.

The ceremony was a colourful highlight of the International Conference called “Qualitative prevention, a new approach towards the circular economy”. During this conference eight EWWR Coordinators presented inspiring best practices from their territories focusing on themes such as food waste, packaging waste, reuse or clean-ups, in countries like Malta, Germany and even the Dominican Republic! The conference featured also presentations of practical experiences on qualitative prevention and a whole session on reuse schemes in the wine and beverage sector. The presentations are available on the following page in the tab entitled 15a Jornada de Prevencio.

The event was also the finishing touch to the four-year financing from LIFE+ programme. Starting from the next edition, the EWWR will enter a new, fresh phase so stay tuned to see the great things to come!

The photos of the event are available here.

Follow @ewwr.eu & @2EWWR to get the latest information about the project, events and also motivating ideas for taking steps towards waste reduction, products reuse, and materials recycling!

The EWWR trophies!
The EWWR trophies!

Join us for the EWWR International Conference and Awards Ceremony in Barcelona!

The European Week for Waste Reduction is getting ready for its great annual celebration: the EWWR International Conference and the EWWR 2016 Awards Ceremony, taking place on 18 May 2017 in Barcelona, Spain. In order to participate and get unique insights from the EWWR experience in waste prevention, please register here.

The conference, entitled “Qualitative prevention, a new approach towards the circular economy”, will explore new awareness-raising management strategies aimed at achieving waste prevention. Several EWWR Coordinators will moreover present best practices and inspiring actions from their territories. We invite you to have a look at the full programme here.

One of the highlights of the conference is the EWWR Awards Ceremony where the most outstanding actions that took place during the last edition of the EWWR from 19 to 27 November 2016 will be rewarded by our distinguished Jury. Out of 86 actions that were submitted by EWWR Coordinators to run for the EWWR Awards, three actions per category of Action Developers have been chosen as finalists. The winner will be announced during the ceremony and will receive the EWWR trophy! Read more about the finalists and the selection process in the press release.

Don’t miss this special EWWR event as it marks the end of the four-year Life+ project after which the EWWR will be entering a new phase. If you wish to find out about the future of the campaign read more here: www.ewwr.eu/en/project/the-ewwr-the-success-story-continues.

Join us on 18 May 2017 in Barcelona! More information here: www.ewwr.eu/en/ideas/awards.

Follow @ewwr.eu & @2EWWR to get the latest information about the project, events and also motivating ideas for taking steps towards waste reduction, products reuse, and materials recycling!

Working together for a more sustainable Europe #4

We are always inspired to read about other projects that address sustainability and the 3Rs: Reduce waste, Reuse products, Recycle materials!

We have recently discovered three new interesting LIFE projects that focus on tackling critical issues such as food waste, sustainable clothing production and consumption and how to boost bottle re-use in the wine sector. Although they focus on three different topics the main and most important aspect is that they address sustainable resource management. Here they are:

LIFE-Food.Waste.StandUp (LIFE15 GIE/IT/000887)

This project is an awareness-raising campaign for food waste prevention and surplus food management. Unlike other initiatives that tackle this problem, the Food Waste Stand Up tries to draw attention to the different actors along the food supply chain and not only on the consumer side. More specifically the main objective is to raise awareness of surplus food management and food waste prevention among three key actors: the agro-food companies, food retailers and consumers. LIFE-Food.Waste.StandUp proposes anti-waste, cross cutting initiatives to address also this side of the problem.

Although their focal working point is in Italy the initiative wishes to have a Europe wide impact by disseminating information, strengthening awareness and knowledge and supporting strategies and incentives that tackle food waste. Read more about them here: ec.europa.eu/environment/life/project/Projects/index.cfm?fuseaction=search.dspPage&n_proj_id=5825

LIFE ECAP - European Sustainable Clothing Action Plan (LIFE14 ENV/UK/000257)

Did you ever think about the impact of clothes, from production point to becoming waste? A report for the EU27 in 2009 revealed that 9.387 billion tonnes of textiles waste are either landfilled or incinerated. In the UK, textiles disposal is the highest by tonnage across the current EU28 countries. The global carbon footprint of UK clothing consumption alone is 38 million tonnes, or 1.5 tonnes of CO2 equivalent per household. Extrapolated across the EU, this is around 317 million tonnes of CO2 eq. This is why LIFE ECAP is pushing for a circular approach in the clothing industry, having several targets which will ideally divert 90 000 tonnes/year of clothing from landfill and incineration across Europe by March 2018, and deliver a more resource efficient clothing sector.

The project will achieve its aim by developing a sectorial approach, based on the principles of the proven UK Sustainable Clothing Action Plan (SCAP), to provide an EU-wide framework to encourage circular business thinking and economic growth. Read more about the European Sustainable Clothing Action Plan here: www.ecap.eu.com/

LIFE-reWINE (LIFE15 ENV/ES/000437)

Although the name might trigger different thoughts reWine is a project that wants to boost bottle re-use in the wine sector of Catalonia. This initiative came after the conclusion that glass beverage waste, especially wine and Cava bottles, are not recycled enough. The region produces 180 million wine bottles and 200 million Cava bottles annually, but only 57% of this amount is recycled. Every year 63.3 million bottles are sent to landfill. The project is engaging a wide range of stakeholders, from wineries to recycling centres and restaurants, and will make use of existing management and technologic alternatives aiming to design and implement a system that will boost re-using glass bottles.

What’s more they will be at our final LIFE International Conference and EWWR Awards Ceremony in Barcelona, in 18 May, organising an interesting workshop where experts from three European countries will discuss about their experiences in the wine sector. Read more about reWine here: www.rewine.cat/ See you in Barcelona!

Together for a more sustainable future!

Follow @ewwr.eu and @2EWWR to get the latest updates from our campaign and more news!

Repurpose – a re-use project for the community

Repurpose is a LIFE+ project that aims at changing the lives of social housing residents through the implementation of re-use schemes in the community. After two years of demonstrating how such a scheme improves the social, environmental and economic level of a community the project has launched a number of resources in the hope of spreading their concept.

The core of Repurpose is the establishment of a re-use hub called Loop, a space from which an estate-wide collection service of unwanted household items is run. These items are repaired if needed and sold at low prices. The project focused also on skills-building and volunteering with dedicated events and training programmes.

The results of the project have recently taken shape! First an Implementation Guide which gives practical guidance to housing providers on re-use schemes was created. Secondly a Toolkit giving support to residents was also made available, and thirdly a Policy Pack was elaborated with the aim of giving recommendations to decision makers at the European, national and regional level on how to support this kind of programme strategically. They are all available at www.repurpose.london.

It’s great to see how finally taking care of the environment leads to taking care of the community!

See the latest news about them by looking for #RepurposeLDN on Twitter!

You can also have a look at the EWWR resources on Reuse by visiting this page and discover some great ideas for actions.

The Loop
The Loop

The finalists for the #EWWR2016 Awards have been selected!

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) is excited to announce the names of the EWWR Awards finalist actions which were implemented in the previous edition of the campaign.

The annual EWWR Awards Ceremony is a festive event created to reward the best actions carried out in each EWWR edition. Out of 86 actions that the EWWR Coordinators submitted for the EWWR Awards this year, three actions per category of Action Developers have been chosen as finalists by the EWWR Awards Jury. Read the Press Release on the EWWR Awards finalists issued today to discover all the finalists and more details about the selection process and the honourable Jury members.

The winners will be announced at the EWWR Awards Ceremony on 18 May 2017 in Barcelona, Spain. The event will be part of the final LIFE EWWR International Conference entitled “Qualitative prevention, a new approach towards circular economy”.

We look forward to seeing you in Barcelona!

Don’t forget to follow us @ewwr.eu & @2EWWR to get the latest information about the project and events!

See you in Barcelona!
See you in Barcelona!

The #EWWR2016 Photo Contest was launched!

The EWWR has launched a Photo Contest to reward the best pictures taken during the EWWR 2016! Action Developers have time until 16 April 2017 to submit a picture to the EWWR Secretariat via Facebook messenger and until 30 April 2017 to press “Like” on their favourite photo.

The rules are simple:

- Every Action Developer can send a photo of their action from the following categories: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Clean-Up;

- Photos should be sent to the EWWR Secretariat via Facebook messenger, otherwise they will not be accepted;

- Action Developers should mention the following information to be included in the description: the category, name of the action, name of the Action Developer, day and place of implementation;

- Action Developers should be sure that they own the rights to the photo;

The photos will be uploaded accordingly in the albums for each category on Facebook. Then it’s time to share it with your friends and shine! The picture with the most “Likes” will win.

We look forward to seeing your fantastic pictures. Keep an eye on @ewwr.eu for more information!

#EWWR2016
#EWWR2016

The EWWR is seeking your help to continue its success story!

In order to continue the EWWR campaign a European Steering Committee will be created. Both public and private actors are invited to be part of the EWWR Steering Committee and contribute financially or in-kind.

Why? The EWWR is truly an exemplary environment project on a European level. The campaign has come a long way from 2009 with more than 73,500 EWWR actions organised and mobilising more than 1.5 million participants! From public authorities to private companies, civil society and individual citizens, a wide range of actors have taken part in this now extensive campaign on the “3Rs”: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and clean-up activities. Moreover the EWWR received important recognition from European and national institutions along the years, being rewarded the “Best of the Best” LIFE project at the LIFE Environment Awards in 2013.

However the current funding under the LIFE+ programme of the European Commission is coming to an end. Therefore we are looking for your support in order to carry on the mission to raise awareness about waste reduction, reuse and recycle!

How to contribute? Find out here.

The first meeting of the European Steering Committe will be held from 3:00pm to 5:30pm on 17 May 2017 in Barcelona.

Help us continue to raise awareness about the critical issues related to waste!

Contact and information:

Lisa Labriga ll@acrplus.org

The EWWR Secretariat contact@ewwr.eu

Save the date for the final EWWR event under the LIFE Programme!

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) is preparing for a grand celebration: the last International Conference and Awards Ceremony within the framework of the LIFE funding programme. The event will take place in Barcelona, Spain on 18 May 2017, and is organised by the Catalan Waste Agency.

The focus of the conference will be on qualitative waste prevention, or more specifically on reducing the hazardous content of waste. New awareness-raising management strategies aimed at achieving waste prevention will be explored during the practical sessions. Furthermore eight EWWR Coordinators from all over Europe will present their best practices showing the achievements of the EWWR project until now. More information about the programme will soon be available.

This date will be marked also by the EWWR Awards Ceremony when the most outstanding actions from the past edition of EWWR will be rewarded for each category (Administration/Public authority, Association/NGO, Business/Industry, Educational Establishment, Citizen(s), Other). The prizes will be handed down by the distinguished Jury members, namely:

  • Piotr Barczak from the European Environmetal Bureau (EEB)
  • Yukiko Tsuburaya from the Foundation for Environmental Education (FEE)
  • Simona Bonafè from the European Parliament (EP)
  • Peter Defranceschi from the Local Governments for Sustainability (ICLEI)
  • Michael Steurer from Eurochambres
  • Gunther Wolff from the European Commission (EC)

Join this central event of the EWWR project!

Don’t forget to follow us @ewwr.eu & @2EWWR to get the latest information about the project and events!

Save the date!
Save the date!

Join the Let’s Clean-Up Europe! campaign and register your action now!

The registrations for the Let’s Clean-Up Europe! (LCUE) campaign have started! The initiative is back for a new year full of clean-up actions. The novelty this time is that the campaign has

A European Spring Clean!
A European Spring Clean!

extended its timeframe in order to enable more Action Developers to organise their activities considering their climatic and geographic conditions.Therefore the implementation of clean-up actions can take place from thew 1st of March until the 30th of June, becoming a major spring clean! In order to register your action please fill in this registration form until the 30th of April. If you have questions the LCUE Coordinators are here to answer them and guide you with organising an effective clean-up event!

The LCUE initiative wants to create a vivid momentum and raise awareness about the critical issues related to litter and unsustainable consumption patterns! For this the second weekend of May, namely from the 12th to 14th of May, will be promoted as the central European Clean-Up Days when Action Developers all around are invited to concentrate their clean-up actions!

Save these dates and join the LCUE campaign! Read more on the Let’s Clean Up Europe! website and get the latest updates and inspiring ideas by following @LCUEofficial & @LetsCleanUpEU!

Working together for a more sustainable Europe #3

We are always glad to read about other projects that address sustainability and the 3Rs: Reduce waste, Reuse products, Recycle materials!

Working together for a more sustainable EU!
Working together for a more sustainable EU!

Promoting the use of sustainable resources must become a common goal for all of us, both as organisations and as individual citizens. Therefore, here we present some other interesting EU projects that are working with us towards a more sustainable environment:

  • Rethink: the RRR campaign happening in Cyprus

Spreading knowledge about the impacts of waste and the good practices of reducing them are essential for maintaining a healthy environment. The Rethink campaign in Cyprus is an inspiring project funded under the LIFE Programme with the aim of raising awareness on the 3Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. It encourages the people of Cyprus to “rethink” their lifestyles and their environmental impact.

As communication plays a key part in diffusing information Rethink makes great use of all media streams, from television ads to social networks, in order to circulate the ideas and practices of the 3Rs to the wider public. Even more they organise events combining creativity and fun with information and good practices! As they said it themselves “Never before has information about the environment and recycling been so much fun!”

Visit rethink.com.cy/en/ to read more about the project in Cyprus.

Electrical and electronic equipment including accumulators and batteries are not a novelty. However what is a novelty nowadays is their ever more complex technological features and unfortunately a general tendency for shorter life expectancy. All of which leads to high amounts of waste. Also referred to as E-waste or WEEE (Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment), it has serious environmental impacts firstly because of resource consumption but also due to their composition and difficulties to separate the materials.

In Slovenia, the project called LIFE E Waste Governance is tackling this issue in a comprehensive way. The aim of the project is not only to enable better infrastructure, collection networks and sustainable management of WEEE but ultimately to change the consumer’s behaviours in Slovenia especially regarding the separation of WEEE. By constantly working to inform and raise awareness the project aims to reach high WEEE collection targets setting up a trend among citizens and also industry.

Read more about the project here: e-odpadki.zeos.si/

Have you ever tried driving a truck in a narrow street? How would you integrate a waste bin near an ancient monument? These are some of the concrete issues faced by the European Heritage Cities when implementing their waste management plans. They are bound to respect strict aesthetic criteria but their winding city centres makes it difficult to implement ordinary methods and equipments.

The INTHERWASTE project is funded under the European Regional Development Fund. This project aims to improve local and regional policies for sustainable waste management in Heritage Cities. After a first phase of learning and exchanging best practices, the project partners will draw action plans, which will then be monitored and shared with other European cities.

Discover more about waste management in Heritage Cities: www.interregeurope.eu/intherwaste and follow the project on twitter @intherwaste

Changing behaviours for a better environment - Commit yourself!

The European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) has developed a motivational tool that encourages citizens all around the world to adopt specific behaviours towards sustainable resource management. Through this online tool, available here www.ewwrcommitment.eu, you too can contribute to reducing the amount of waste that is overwhelming for our environment. The principle is simple: you can choose from 14 good habits, for example composting or avoiding overpackaged products, and pledge that you will adhere to this attitude.

Specifically during the EWWR 1,942 commitments have been made, meaning that raising awareness about waste reduction was successful.

The total number of commitments that have been endorsed by citizens all around the world through the EWWR commitment tool and also its Hungarian version until now is 3,273[1]. This simple action permits further engagement from citizens also outside Europe and beyond the time frame of EWWR. The aim is to reach as many citizens as possible to raise awareness about the easy steps that can be made to reduce the waste we produce.

Commit yourself and join the waste reducers community!



[1] As of 20 December 2016.

EWWR 2016: 12,255 actions that speak louder than words!

The 8th edition of the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) has proven to be triumphant once again! After months of preparations with the great work of 43 EWWR Coordinators and numerous Action Developers, 12,255 actions will in implemented in 32 different countries.

From 19 to 27 November 2016, you are invited to participate in EWWR actions and raise awareness about the critical issues related to waste. Inspiring examples range from sustainable festivals to original information campaigns on packaging waste reduction, swapping events and so on. Find out if there is an action taking place close to you in the EWWR Database!

You can have a look at our EWWR Press Release!

For more details please refer to the EWWR Press Kit which includes the key numbers and other specific information, as well as a map of EWWR Actions and the description of one interesting action implemented on each territory of the EWWR Coordinators.

Keep your eyes on #EWWR2016 & #UseLessPackaging to see what is happening during the EWWR on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!

Last chance to register for EWWR 2016!

The European Week for Waste Reduction will take place between 19 and 27 November and preparations are in full swing! We have already spotted some great actions and the excitement is growing as the number of actions is going up. The registration period has started on the 1st of September and will end on the 9th of November.

What are you waiting for? Register an action to raise awareness about the 3Rs right now: www.ewwr.eu/register.

But before the grand week there are several things that you need to keep in mind: You too can become an important player in raising awareness on issues related to waste! No matter your location, no matter your profession, no matter your age, take part! The rules are simple: Action Developers are citizens, educational establishments, businesses and industry, associations and NGOs, administrative bodies or public authorities that commit to informing as many citizens as possible about the good practices of waste prevention, reuse or recycling during the week.

The action can be anything from conferences to contests, to information booths or exhibitions. It can be as simple as encouraging your neighbours to use no-ads stickers on their letter boxes! The EWWR appreciates everyone that takes action to reduce waste!
Nevertheless, the more inspiring and efficient the action is, the higher are your chances to be selected for the EWWR awards! If you need some inspiration we invite you to explore our ideas for actions on Reuse, Reduce and Recycle: www.ewwr.eu/en/ideas/ideas-for-actions.

Carry out an action to draw attention on the importance of the 3Rs: Reduce waste, Reuse products, Recycle materials! You have until 9 November to sign up and register your idea right here www.ewwr.eu/register.

The European Week for Waste Reduction is right around the corner!

Registrations for the EWWR 2016 have started!

This year’s edition of the European Week for Waste Reduction will take place between 19th and 27th November and we know that, once again, it will be a week full of outstanding waste reduction actions! In order to make this possible Action Developers are invited to register their action between 1st September and 4th November right here: www.ewwr.eu/register. If you are new to this project but have a great idea about how to raise awareness regarding waste reduction in your community then take up the role of the Action Developer and contact the Coordinator of your region or country. You can read more about it here: www.ewwr.eu/en/take_part/info.

To make the week even more interesting our proposal for the Prevention Thematic Days is about Packaging Waste Reduction! Why? Although packaging is useful in many cases, there are critical issues regarding packaging waste. This is why we encourage Action Developers and participants to carry out actions in order to reduce packaging waste. See some factsheets and guidelines which we prepared right here: www.ewwr.eu/en/support/prevention-thematic-days-2016.

Dare to take action!

Register your action here: www.ewwr.eu/register

The European Week for Waste Reduction 2016 is getting closer!

As you might already know this year the European Week for Waste Reduction will take place between 19th and 27th November. What you didn’t know until now was the registration period! So save the dates between 1st September and 4th November 2016 as it is the period in which you, as an Action Developer, can register your waste reduction actions and thus take part in EWWR! If you are not an Action Developer yet you can sign up anytime here: http://www.ewwr.eu/en/take_part/info.

Moreover did you know that every year the EWWR focuses on a theme? It is called the Prevention Thematic Days. Last year, the focus was on Dematerialisation: Doing more with less! Two years ago it was about Food waste and three years ago Reuse was under the spotlight. You can have a look at each of them by clicking on this link: www.ewwr.eu/en/support/prevention-thematic-days. Of course, you are still free to pick another theme linked to waste reduction.

This year’s Prevention Thematic Days edition will focus on: Packaging Waste Reduction – Use Less Packaging! Why? Because despite its usefulness, there are many issues surrounding packaging waste, more exactly high resource consumption and environmental degradation. We highly encourage Action Developers and participants to carry out actions regarding this topic. We believe that this is a crucial problem which is why we also developed some factsheets and guidelines in order to help you. See them here: www.ewwr.eu/en/support/prevention-thematic-days-2016. A promotional poster will also be available soon!

We look forward to seeing extraordinary actions in the name of waste reduction this year too!

The Best LIFE Project Awards 2016

This year’s LIFE Best Projects Awards took place on 31 May 2016 during EU Green Week, which is one of the greatest events where environmental policies are discussed, so it made perfect sense to award the most outstanding LIFE projects during this occasion. Not so long ago, more exactly in 2013, the EWWR project was also elected one of the “Best of the Best” among the projects.

A total of 51 finalists were given the “Best LIFE Project” title for the year 2015 in the categories Nature, Environment and Information & Communication within the same strands. The honour of being “Best of the Best” was given to 11 winners from Cyprus, Finland, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Spain and UK.

Among the finalists there were many projects from the waste world demonstrating that this sector has so much more to offer in terms of innovation. Here they are:

BREAD4PLA - Demonstration-Plant Project to Produce Poly-Lactic Acid (PLA) Biopolymer From Waste Products of Bakery Industry

POLYMIX - Polymer Wastes in Asphalt Mixes: a Way to Increase Sustainability of Roads Infrastructures

ELINA - Integrated green life-cycle management of waste oils and petroleum residues

NOW - No more organic waste. A new integrated system to eliminate organic waste in the organised large scale distribution -

REBIRTH - Promotion of the recycling of industrial waste and building rubble for the construction industry

GREEN SINKS - Realization of green composite sinks substituting organic and mineral primary materials by recovered waste

One “Best of the Best” project especially caught our eye. This was from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and it is called SEWeb - Scotland’s environmental web. Its aim is to create a platform where services and environmental information are shared. This system could become a single point of access for all the environment related data in Scotland, but its potential could cross frontiers, and work at EU level, or even globally! It is an inspiring project from which the waste management sector could gain a lot.

Working together for a more sustainable Europe #2

We are always glad to discover other projects that address sustainability and the 3Rs: Reduce waste, Reuse products, Recycle materials! Promoting the use of sustainable resources must become a common goal for all of us, both as organisations and as individual citizens. Therefore, here we present some other interesting EU projects that are working with us towards a more sustainable environment.

· Don’t Waste Our Future

Did you know that 1/3 of the food produced worldwide is wasted? This is an incredible amount which the project Don’t Waste Our Future wants to change!

Don’t Waste Our Future is a project aiming to build a European youth alliance against food waste and for the global right to good. For this project, young people from 7 European countries (Belgium, Portugal, Italy, Cyprus, United Kingdom, France and Spain) worked together to raise awareness on the fight against food waste and for the global right to food. Many of these students met in Milan during the World Expo 2015 and wrote a European charter: “A joint European manifesto of young people and local authorities to promote food waste reduction and the global right to food”.

Join the fight against food waste and sign the Charter here: www.dontwaste.eu/charter

Discover the Don’t Waste Our Future project: www.dontwaste.eu

· EcoLife

One of the most important factors influencing our degrading environment is our consumerist behaviours. This is having a critical impact on the environment but it can be changed if the right guidance is provided to the citizens! We do not always know which choice is the best or what we can individually accomplish to safeguard our environment.

EcoLife, a project funded by the European Commission, aims to change behaviours that negatively influence the environment, and push for sustainable changes in our daily habits towards a
sustainable lifestyle. Through exploiting the knowledge and experience achieved in professional communication on risk perception and risk prevention, the project wishes to raise awareness and achieve an effective reduction of CO2 emissions. The actions focus on different aspects of our current lifestyle, including our waste.

Are you ready to change your daily habits? Visit www.ecolifestyles.eu/en

· Waste on a diet

As European citizens, we surely need to put our waste on a diet! To achieve this, Sybert has developed the project Waste on diet which aims to reduce waste, increase the recycling of materials and control the costs.

They believe that waste reduction can be achieved thanks to citizens’ participation. The project includes a waste prevention awareness campaigns going into small but important details like shopping, preparing meals, redesigning clothes and furniture, purchasing second hand goods. This is an essential aspect of setting the base for a sustainable lifestyle! The project is also supported by the LIFE programme of the European Union, which underlines its importance and contribution to the EU sustainable development goals.

For more information explore their website here: http://sybert.fr/presentation.html

Let’s all work together for a more sustainable Europe!

Webin@r Training Session 8 - 28 June 2016

The 8th training session will be held on 28 June 2016 from 10:30 to 12:00 (CET).

This trainning session will focus on the new Communication Tools done by the European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) Project.
These tools are esential because they offer help to all interested bodies in their quest to address target groups more specifically. Participants in this trainning session will have the chance to learn in detail about these targeted communication toolkits implemented and promoted by EWWR partners for targeted groups such as schools, businesses, public authorities and so on.

This training is also a great opportunity to find out more about the European Week for Waste Reduction 2016 which will be held from 19 to 27 November! But more importantly about this edition’s Prevention Thematic Days which will have its focus on Packaging Waste!

We look forward to share this experience with you and get up to date with the latest tools in communication but also find out more about packaging waste reduction!

We kindly invite you to participate in this webinar by registering here.

To have a closer look at the event please see the program.

To find out more about this webin@r please see this page.

Also do not hesitate to have a look on our previous trainings.

Webin@r Training Session 7 - 9 June 2016

The seventh webinar training will be held on 9 June 2016.

This training session will be focused on the winning actions of the 7th European Week for Waste Reduction (EWWR) Awards. Whoever wants to participate will have the chance to learn about the best practices for waste prevention, reuse and recycling from the selected actions of EWWR 2015. Every category of Action Developers will be covered by detailed presentations with the aim of showing how each action was successfully implemented.

We kindly invite you to participate in this webinar by registering here. To have a closer look at the event please see the program.

We look forward to seeing you and get up-to-date with the latest success stories from the world of waste prevention.

Please find more information about this webinar on this page.
Don’t hesitate to have a look at our previous training sessions!

Next webinar
The next webinar will be held on 28 June 2016!

The winners of the European Week for Waste Reduction Awards!

The most outstanding actions of EWWR 2015 were rewarded!

This year’s Awards Ceremony of the European Week for Waste Reduction, a project under the tutelage of ACR+ took place in Brussels on the 11th of May. The event was hosted in the wonderful auditorium of Brussels Environment, where the finalists and winners were granted their well-deserved awards, filling the air with much joy.

The ceremony was an excellent finishing touch for the international conference “Circular Economy in practice: Rethinking our production and consumption models” jointly organised by Brussels Environment and ACR+. This year’s actions have reassured again that people are more and more aware of waste issues, setting up a challenging task for the esteemed Jury who had to pick six actions from 18 finalists, one for each of the following categories: Administration/Public Authority, Association/NGO, Business/Industry, Educational Establishment, Citizens and Others.

Details about the winners can be found in the Press Release, with a comprehensive overview of the EWWR Awards in the Press File.

Nevertheless the campaign will continue with the next EWWR taking place between the 19th and 27th November 2016. To catch a glimpse about what happened all year around have a look at the retrospective of EWWR 2015!

EWWR 2015 Awards - Finalists have been selected!

The European Week for Waste Reduction is pleased to announce the finalists running for the EWWR 2015 Awards!

The annual EWWR Awards ceremony is an event created to reward the most outstanding actions carried out in each EWWR edition.

On 7th of March 2016, out of more than 90 actions that EWWR Coordinators had submitted to run for the EWWR Awards, three actions per category of Action Developers have been chosen as finalists by the EWWR Awards Jury.

You can discover all finalists as well as more details about the selection and the awards Jury in the Press Release on the EWWR Awards finalists that has been issued today.

The winners will be announced at the EWWR Awards ceremony on 11th of May 2016 in Brussels, following the International Conference: “Circular Economy in practice: Rethinking our production and consumption models”.

We would be more than happy to welcome you at these events!

The 2015 EWWR Awards Ceremony in Brussels!

On the 11th of May the annual EWWR Awards Ceremony will be rewarding, in Brussels, the most outstanding actions of the EWWR 2015 and celebrating the EWWR and its participants! We warmly invite you to this evening of EWWR celebration!

A Jury of European professionals working in the environmental sector will reward finalists and winners amongst all the many inspiring EWWR actions.

Follow this link to discover the Jury members of this edition.

The Awards Ceremony will take place in the evening of the international conference ‘’Circular Economy in practice: Rethinking our production and consumption models’’, to which you are also invited.

Come and join us for the 2015 Awards Ceremony to get an insight into this fantastic project and celebrate the EWWR success!

Register here!

Have a look at last year’s EWWR Ceremony pictures and read about 2015 EWWR finalists!

Let’s team up to tackle and reduce litter! Let’s clean up Europe!

The European Clean-Up Day, this year will be taking place on 6-8 May 2016 providing the perfect occasion for everyone to roll up their sleeves and tackle littering. Institutions, local authorities, associations, schools, citizens, companies and others are all welcomed to participate in this event by organizing litter collections all over Europe.

This action provides a unique opportunity to raise citizens’ awareness on the litter problem and to help changing people’s behaviour. In order to share these events, participants are encouraged to take photos and videos of their actions and to disseminate them via social networks (Twitter @LetsCleanUpEU and Facebook page Let’s Clean Up Europe - Official using the hashtag #cleanupeurope).

If you want to get involved and participate in this campaign, please refer to the Coordinator responsible for your area to register your action and to get all information and communication material.

Everyone can make a change! Be the change!

Participate to Let’s Clean-Up Europe 2016!

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